Warning: count(): Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable in /home/tbrnew5/public_html/wp-includes/post-template.php on line 284

TBR News April 16, 2016

Apr 16 2016

The Voice of the White House

Washington, D.C. April 16, 2016: “The current Turkish president has apparently been reading “Mein Kampf” because of his patently obvious attempts to turn his country into a Sunni Muslim police state. Hypersensitive to any criticism, he is now demanding that Germany prosecute a German comic for singing a mocking song about him. Next, it is obvious, he will murder all the Kurds in Turkkey, women and children included, and thus emulate the Turkish slaughter of a million Armenians in 1916. The United States has such charming and progressive allies!”

 

Note: Readers with interesting information, questions or comments can contact us at: tbrnews@hotmail.com

 

 

Conversations with the Crow

On October 8th, 2000, Robert Trumbull Crowley, once a leader of the CIA’s Clandestine Operations Division, died in a Washington hospital of heart failure and the end effects of Alzheimer’s Disease. Before the late Assistant Director Crowley was cold, Joseph Trento, a writer of light-weight books on the CIA, descended on Crowley’s widow at her town house on Cathedral Hill Drive in Washington and hauled away over fifty boxes of Crowley’s CIA files.

Once Trento had his new find secure in his house in Front Royal , Virginia, he called a well-known Washington fix lawyer with the news of his success in securing what the CIA had always considered to be a potential major embarrassment. Three months before, July 20th of that year, retired Marine Corps colonel William R. Corson, and an associate of Crowley, died of emphysema and lung cancer at a hospital in Bethesda, Md.           After Corson’s death, Trento and his Washington lawyer went to Corson’s bank, got into his safe deposit box and removed a manuscript entitled ‘Zipper.’ This manuscript, which dealt with Crowley’s involvement in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, vanished into a CIA burn-bag and the matter was considered to be closed forever

After Crowley’s death and Trento’s raid on the Crowley files, huge gaps were subsequently discovered by horrified CIA officials and when Crowley’s friends mentioned Gregory Douglas, it was discovered that Crowley’s son had shipped two large boxes to Douglas. No one knew their contents but because Douglas was viewed as an uncontrollable loose cannon who had done considerable damage to the CIA’s reputation by his on-going publication of the history of Gestapo-Mueller, they bent every effort both to identify the missing files and make some effort to retrieve them before Douglas made any use of them.

Douglas had been in close contact with Crowley and had long phone conversations with him. He found this so interesting and informative that he taped and later transcribed them.

These conversations have been published in a book: ‘Conversations with the Crow” and this is an excerpt.

 

Conversation No. 113

Date: Wednesday, December 1,1997

Commenced: 11:22 AM CST

Concluded: 11:55 AM PST

 

RTC: Good morning to you, Gregory. I wanted to have a little talk with you about your books and other matters. Do you have some time now?

GD: Oh, certainly.

RTC: Some people I know of are getting very unhappy with you and your books. The books about Mueller and us. I don’t tell you about some of this but over the past six-eight months I have been contacted, both in person and on the phone, concerning you and your activities. First of all, your detractors have advised me that you are a criminal, a crook, a convict, a dope addict, a mental case, a spy for some foreign country and many other sins of commission. Naturally, I have taken notes and, even more important, I have taken down names and such other information as telephone numbers and, when I can find them, home addresses. And poor Emily has been spoken to about my contacts with you. She has no idea what we talk about and, as is usual with CIA wives, she knows very little about my activities when I was with the Company. Oh yes, a female FBI agent, so sympathetic, came and talked with her about what a thoroughly evil and crazy person you were and warning her to try and keep me away from you. Of course Emily told me all about it and gave me the woman’s card. And two days ago, another wonderful person got in touch with my son, Greg, and told him the same things. The new theme is that old Crowley is getting nuts and perhaps he might be institutionalized for his own good. Greg was horrified because he has mailed boxes of sensitive documents to you in Wisconsin and Greg tends to be somewhat conventional. I think they want to find some nice, discreet way to shut me up. They have given up on you, of course. Kimmel told Bill that you were arrogant, self-important and very dangerous and has warned him to keep away from you.

GD: Yes, well Bill told me my son could get a job with the CIA as you know….

RTC: Of course. And that would be to have him fill in a ten page questionnaire that would let them all know more about you. According to Kimmel, you have used more aliases than the Manhattan phone book. You have at least a dozen passports and have lived in Europe where, they darkly hint, you have somehow fallen into the clutches of the KGB…

GD: Actually, the SVR. Same organization but a different name. A rose by any other name Robert.

RTC: Yes. A thoroughly sinister person. They are so concerned about me that they constantly warn my son and my wife about your evil ways and beg both of them to not only report anything they hear to the really sympathetic agents or former co workers or their wives. And if that fails, perhaps I will fall down the back stairs or on my rare appearances outside this place, be run over by a drunken cab driver while walking in a large shopping mall.

GD: (Laughter) Or how about a dead elephant falling on your head after accidentally being chucked out of an Air America cargo plane on its way to deliver three tons of raw opium to Manhattan drug refiners?  That might happen. I would keep away from doctors, Robert, unless you are really sick and then try to get them to make house calls.

RTC: Yes, I am aware of all of that. Used to do it.

GD: I think something ought to be done about all of this. What about doing the book on Kennedy?

RTC: I’ve thought about that, Gregory, and I ought to warn you about some of the pitfalls. I’ve told you before that we have a wonderful and very effective disinformation branch and they are even now gearing up to try to convince people not to listen to you or read your books. Of course they have to be careful because you have the reputation for savage personal attacks on people who get in your way so right now, they are after the Mueller material but if you get into Kennedy, then you will have a hornet’s nest come down around your ears. Why? Because in order to keep the sheep from getting curious about the wrong things, we set up a wonderful disinformation machine, complete with retired local policemen, librarians of all kinds, professors of philosophy from jerkwater community colleges and former Marine Corps Master Sergeants who were in the quartermaster section and never heard a shot fired in anger.

GD: And don’t forget Wolfe

RTC: Do spare me, Gregory. I just had lunch and reptiles so soon after feeding make me ill. Yes, Wolfe. Typical. A nobody in a nothing position but he can say he is an employee of the National Archives. Sounds impressive but he has nothing to say and can’t access any records you couldn’t get by just going there. He and hundreds of his kind are right in our pocket. That one gets a pat on the head and a pen set but a few others, key information peddlers, get a check on some unknown charity from time to time and perhaps a job for their airhead daughter or son. That’s how it works. We really don’t have to lay out much money on these fools because they come, panting, to us, begging for that pat on the pointy head and the nice pen set. The CIA  buys them by the gross and I think they’re made in China in a slave-labor factory.

GD: (Laughter) Napoleon once said, concerning the Legion of Honor, ‘With such baubles, men are led.’

RTC: It seems to work. Believe me, we have armies of these people on tap and most of them are pathetic creeps, desperate to be recognized for the brilliant thinkers they are not and never could be. But anyway, Gregory, they are now after you and your writing but I have the feeling I ought to have pity on them. As I said, if and when you get into the Kennedy business, you will kick over a hornet’s nest of vicious, stupid and fanatical idiots. And while some of them are ours and part of our disinformation program, the rest are crazies, entirely on their own. But if you, or anyone else, dare to express opinions different from their very own precious ones, they will screech like banshees and gang up on you. One fat old crazy up in Minnesota who teaches philosophy has decided that some powerful organization used sabot shells on Kennedy. They had real used bullets, but them into a case and shot Jack in the melon and the case fell off.

GD: The Germans had sabot artillery shells but I doubt if anyone used these on a 6.5 piece. Did you put him up to such shit?

RTC: No. His uncle is a retired Company man and he is looking for instant fame and fortune.

GD: The uncle? I thought you people were supposed to keep quiet.

RTC: Sorry, the nephew. Whatever. At any rate, beware the questioned cultist and believe me, the Kennedy business has turned into a cult. My God, reading over their psychotic trash gives me acid stomach. Still, they serve a purpose. They sprouted so much underbrush that the real facts will probably never come out. And if you publish even a portion of what I sent you, the howling will begin.

GD: I know how to deal with them, Robert. Make fun of them. Most of them are laughable, pathetic creeps and if you take them seriously, you empower them so the best course is to hold them up to public ridicule. You know, I have a really neat method of dealing with the official creeps and the unofficial ones.

RTC: And…?

GD: Oh yes. And you publish something really awful and then, in the foreword, you praise the slob for all his help with your work. Or, even better, publish something deadly and say they wrote it. I’ll bet this does real wonders for their careers, not to mention their small but vicious circle of friends or family. Imagine some assistant AG writing a piece for some gay newspaper claiming he has come out of the closet and is so proud of it. Or something in defense of pedophilia. Or one fellow I dealt a deadly blow to was supposed to have some awful pictures of Lyndon Larouche in a nut house and was writing a book about it. I got his letterhead, copied it on the notice of the new book and also printed up an envelope. Looked so real, Robert, And when I wrote up the advert, I personally addressed it to about a thousand people, including major newspapers and so on and actually flew to his hometown and mailed the things. For the correct postmark of course.

RTC: (Laughter) And what happened?

GD: Actually? His car was set on fire. Someone broke all the big windows in his store. Someone sent him boxes of decaying and smelly animal insides. His business collapsed, his wife left him and he eventually checked into a cheap motel and offed himself with a bottle of sleeping pills. Now the shit is up with Jesus, playing gin rummy with the angels.

RTC: Do you really believe that?

GD: Oh, I know he’s dead but about the angels, no, I don’t believe there are such entities. Once the lights go out, I don’t think there is an upwards path you take, bathed in glorious light and at the top stand your entire long-dead family, waving and smiling at you.  I wonder how they might look, Robert. Clothed in shining glory? Rotting flesh dripping from grinning skulls? Looking like they never did alive with bigger tits, a smaller nose, really clear skin instead of looking like someone put out a fire on their face with an icepick, and not walking on their hands and knees?

RTC: Have you ever discussed such negative sentiments with a priest?

GD: Robert, of course not. I’m hedging my bets. No, I know about the congregation of Kennedy nuts and it might be fun to plant my number ten shoe in their number one size scrotum. But the women are worse than the men…that is if there is much of a gender difference. You people have so many nutless wonders working for you.  The women have hairy bowed legs, bad teeth, sagging breasts and hate everyone but their pet Budgie, Mr. Tweety. They get rabid over the stupidest things and shriek with rage if you make fun of their sacred and supportive icons. And the men are mostly prissy busybodies who are laboring under the total misapprehension that are really somebody in particular. Which, of course, they aren’t. Probably a lot of vegetarians represented there with a few dozen Scientologists, Christian Scientists and Jesus freaks thrown in the mix to offset the thick of neck and tiny of brain. And in the men, the brain isn’t the only tiny thing. Jesus, if it weren’t for the common turkey baster, half these shrimp dicks could never father pinhead children. And don’t  knock pinhead children, either. You can give them haircuts in a pencil sharpener and save so much money. And when they get older and housebroken, why your people can recruit them. Put them in charge of the Havana office. Or was that the Sterling Chemical people? I think so.

RTC: Now, it isn’t that bad, Gregory. You know that.

GD: I don’t. Actually, it’s worse. I started out in life, Robert, trusting people and believing everyone was a gentleman or a lady. Of course I had the opportunity of growing up in the second richest community in the country. The children of senators, heads of business empires and the like were my school friends. I was taught manners as a child and always used them. But then, as I got out into the world, I discovered, to my horror, that Jonathan Swift was right and the Yahoos ruled. Oh yes, read ‘Gulliver’s Travels’ and discover the world. You take care of the weak and persecuted and destroy the vicious and predatory. Physically or by other means. I detest pedophiles because they ruin the lives of relatively innocent little children and creeps who do that should be publicly castrated with those dull scissors we got in kindergarten and then burned alive. No, you would have never recognized me as a child. I was a very well-behaved, educated person and nice to know, at least reading over my childhood school reports. Ah, but now, I am known as Lord Satan by the boobery, the idiots and the syphilitic cretins that infest this otherwise pleasant planet. And mark this, Robert. Too many people, too little food. And the water will run out and the ice of the world will melt, the oceans rise and Boston will be nothing but a wet dream. I really do hope, Robert,that these catastrophes happen in my life so I can have something to enjoy besides my books and music. There are intelligent, decent people here but they are lost in the jungle of knuckle-draggers.

RTC: Something awful must have happened to you at some point in your life to have given you such a really ugly view of the world.

GD: I think that goes without saying. I told Heini Mueller once that I always pay back my enemies and the flip side of that is that if people leave me alone, why let them go their shambling way to the knackers without any assistance or encouragement from me. Mueller was a good man, Robert, and you knew him. Not many people like that around and probably never were. You see, they outnumber us by a ratio of about a thousand to one. Is that why you like to talk to me, Lord Satan, chief evildoer and disrespecter of vested authority?

RTC: Yes, there aren’t too many like you around, Gregory. Some would say Thank God, like Kimmel, but I enjoy your attitudes and I must say I agree with them, at least mostly.

GD: And I have a perverse sense of humor, Robert. Very perverse. A live-in girlfriend used to pilfer my shampoo and put the empty bottle back on the shelf. I then, angry because when I wanted shampoo, there was only an empty bottle, I filled it with hair remover and she later used it and had to wear a wig for months and when she wasn’t, her short hair made her look like a bull dyke.

RTC: (Laughter) An object of terror.

GD: An object of shame and derision, Robert. Did I ever tell you about the great fake fingerprint game?

RTC: Perhaps you might have, Gregory, but my memory is not what it used to be.

GD: I was at a gun show once and someone had a sheaf of old FBI fingerprint cards from the ‘30s. Bank robbers, car thieves and the rest. I bought about twenty of them for a dollar apiece. Then I had zincs made for me by my print shop…

RTC: Zincs?

GD: Well a reverse negative that is etched in zinc and you use it for rubber stamps. Anyway, I had a number of zincs of the fingerprints of terrible anti-social people so I went to a shop that dealt in theatrical things and bought a bottle of liquid latex and some spirit gum. I painted the latex into the zinc and hey! Presto! I had a perfect copy of the felonious fingerprint. Take a pair of rubber surgeon’s gloves, cut out the new print, use the spirit gum to put it down onto the glove in the right place and then you have the makings of a huge joke. Imagine, if you will, doing something very anti-social and even downright evil and wearing these gloves. Touch every surface in sight. Ah, later the prints are lifted and sent off to the FBI for identification. Wonderful. Some technician screams ‘a fifteen pointer…”

RTC: A what?

GD: Fifteen points are fifteen points of identification, Robert. Can’t go any higher unless the perp’s severed hand was found in the woman’s snatch. Anyway, they run these wonderfully clear prints through the system. Amazement, two weeks later, to discover they belonged to Ronald Mung, convicted bank robber and serial flasher. No question at all. One problem. Herr Mung has been dead since the second Roosevelt administration . Confusion rampant. I never hear about this but I have a good imagination. Are they going out to Holy Cross boneyard and dig Mung up and charge him with aggravated mopery? Serial bicycle-seat sniffing? What? Issue a warrant for a very dead man?

RTC: Of course not. The Bureau would never talk about it and tell the local cops that they could not make any kind of identification but they would keep the prints on record. Phoebe never makes mistakes. Tell me, Gregory, did you ever tell Kimmel about this?

GD: Of course. I like my fun.

RTC: I can imagine his response.

GD: Yes, it doesn’t take a Republican to figure that one out. Just another example of my anti-social and mentally disturbed behavior. These people have absolutely no sense of humor and when they get an idea in their heads,that is if, they cling to it like a mama monkey with a dead baby. No imagination, Robert, no sense of humor. And if it isn’t in the little book, it can’t have happened.

RTC: (Laughter) I can just hear the stink when the prints of a long dead car thief show up in some unexpected place. They would never know what to do.

GD: No, if it isn’t in your book, the little book they all carry for guidance and instruction, it can’t exist and if it can’t exist, it doesn’t.

RTC: Did you really do that business with the fingerprints?

GD: Oh, a number of times, Robert, but we don’t need to burden you with useless details.

(Concluded at 11:55 AM

 

http://www.amazon.com/Conversations-Crow-Gregory-Douglas-ebook/dp/B00GHMAQ5E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1450147193&sr=8-1&keywords=conversations+with+the+crow#sthash.jWpLL7Wr.dpuf

.

52% of GOP voters see Trump most likely to ‘get things done’ – poll

April 15, 2016

RT

With New Yorkers set to vote in high-stakes presidential primaries on Tuesday, 52 percent of Republican voters think Trump is the most likely to “get things done” in Washington, according to a new poll.

One-third of Republican voters think Trump should run as an independent if he loses the nomination, according to the latest CBS poll released on Thursday.

The poll found Trump was still the favored frontrunner with 42 percent of primary voters, but Texas Senator Ted Cruz had closed the cap with 29 percent of voters supporting him, a growth of seven percent since last month. Ohio Governor John Kasich trailed on 18 percent.

However, Senator Cruz did lead among conservative voters, scoring 46 percent of those polled, compared to 40 percent for Trump. Those voters attended religious services weekly.

When it comes to the party’s nomination, 60 percent of Republican voters expected Trump to win, but that is down from 77 percent last month.

None of those polled saw any of the candidates as a party unifier, but Trump was seen as the candidate most likely to get things done once he gets to Washington if he wins the election, and 70 percent of voters think Trump says what he believes.

At a sold-out New York State Republican gala on Thursday night, Trump played the ham.

“Who the hell wants to talk about politics all the time?” the billionaire businessman asked the room, according to the Observer. “Because politics gets a little boring.”

Outside, protesters filled a city block for several hours to protest Trump’s campaign for president and his racist rhetoric, chanting “How do you spell racist? T-R-U-M-P.”

The results come from a CBS News poll conducted with 1,320 adults nationwide, including over 1,000 registered voters, and 399 likely to vote in a Republican primary.

 

Microsoft Says U.S. Is Abusing Secret Warrants

April 14, 2016

by Jenna McLaughlin

The Intercept

“We appreciate that there are times when secrecy around a government warrant is needed,” Microsoft President Brad Smith wrote in a blog post on Thursday. “But based on the many secrecy orders we have received, we question whether these orders are grounded in specific facts that truly demand secrecy. To the contrary, it appears that the issuance of secrecy orders has become too routine.”

With those words, Smith announced that Microsoft was suing the Department of Justice for the right to inform its customers when the government is reading their emails.

The last big fight between the Justice Department and Silicon Valley was started by law enforcement, when the FBI demanded that Apple unlock a phone used by San Bernardino killer Syed Rizwan Farook.

This time, Microsoft is going on the offensive. The move is welcomed by privacy activists as a step forward for transparency — though it’s also for business reasons.

Secret government searches are eroding people’s trust in the cloud, Smith wrote — including large and small businesses now keeping massive amounts of records online. “The transition to the cloud does not alter people’s expectations of privacy and should not alter the fundamental constitutional requirement that the government must — with few exceptions — give notice when it searches and seizes private information or communications,” he wrote.

According to the complaint, Microsoft received 5,624 federal demands for customer information or data in the past 18 months. Almost half — 2,576 — came with gag orders, and almost half of those — 1,752 — had “no fixed end date” by which Microsoft would no longer be sworn to secrecy.

These requests, though signed off on by a judge, qualify as unconstitutional searches, the attorneys argue. It “violates both the Fourth Amendment, which affords people and businesses the right to know if the government searches or seizes their property, and the First Amendment, which enshrines Microsoft’s rights to talk to its customers and to discuss how the government conducts its investigations — subject only to restraints narrowly tailored to serve compelling government interests,” they wrote.

Microsoft has sued the government three other times in the past to provide more transparency on secret information requests — winning the right to disclose the number of legal requests received and pressuring the government to withdraw a national security letter — an even more shadowy form of government demand that does not require approval from a judge. Its third case challenging a warrant for a foreign customer’s data is still in court.

Microsoft isn’t the only company pushing for more transparency in times when the government comes knocking. Over 60 companies now release transparency reports since Google started the trend in 2010. Companies including Google and Twitter have also gone to court to release more information in their semi-annual transparency reports. And Uber just published its first transparency report this week, revealing that it forked over data on 12 million drivers and riders to 33 regulatory agencies, including state and local law enforcement, in just the second half of 2015.

 

Why is America pulling down the projects?

April 14, 2016

by Jasmine Coleman

BBC

For decades some of the poorest people in the US have lived in subsidised housing developments often known as “projects”. Many of these projects, however, are now being torn down and studies suggest only one in three residents find a home in the mixed-income developments built to replace them.

Windows are boarded up, chunks of plaster crumble from the walls and a collection of soft toys and flowers signifies the spot where a young man was recently killed.

“Animals get better care and attention to housing conditions than this,” says Phyllissa Bilal. “People can go to a Third World country and say they’re shocked at the horrible conditions. But then they drive past people here every day who live in the same.”

Built in 1943, Barry Farm lies along one of the main commuting routes into the US capital. It is just over the Anacostia River from Washington Navy Yard, the US Navy’s headquarters, and less than two miles (3km) from Capitol Hill.

But while few would choose to bring up a family here, when Bilal and her husband were granted a home in 2011 she says it “meant everything”. Their previous home had burned down several years earlier and a house on the Farms, as the estate is known, offered them – and their five, soon six, children – “a chance to get back on our feet”.

She has been proud to call the housing project home. “It’s a community, it’s almost like an extension of your family,” she says. But now it is due for demolition.

Neglected and plagued by crime, it is one of thousands of public housing projects across the US deemed to have failed, and slated to be replaced by mixed-income developments, of homes and shops.

But during the process of destruction and reconstruction, Bilal does not know where her family will go.

The construction of public housing became national policy in 1937 as part of President Franklin D Roosevelt’s New Deal – a series of social reforms introduced in response to the Great Depression. Ed Goetz, author of New Deal Ruins: Race, Economic Justice, and Public Housing Policy, says many public housing projects built during this time were successful, well-built and well-managed.

Some remain popular today. Plans to redevelop the country’s first federally funded housing project for African Americans – Rosewood Court in Austin, Texas – have prompted a campaign to protect it by securing recognition of its historical importance.

Public housing in the US

◾About 1.1 million homes in public housing in the US, compared to more than 2.5 million in the UK (not including those owned by housing associations)

◾More than a third of those living in public housing in the US are under 18

◾The average annual household income is $14,455 (£10,234)

◾Most public housing tenants spend 30% of their income on rent

◾At least 1.6 million families are said to be on waiting lists – disabled people, the elderly and families with children, often get preference

Sources: HUD, ONS, Scottish government, NISRA, PHADA

Although black and white people lived in separate buildings, the housing projects of the 1930s provided homes to working-class residents of all races.

But this changed after World War Two when new low-interest mortgages helped white working-class people buy homes in the suburbs. A 1949 law also made public housing available only to people on the lowest incomes. So in time the projects began to house only the poorest minority communities.

The US government had aimed to build one million homes in public housing projects by 1955, but by 1967 only 633,000 were in use. In an attempt to cut costs, many housing authorities also began skimping on materials and construction. From that point forward, the buildings tended to be neither well-made nor well maintained, says Goetz.

By the early 1950s high-rise projects were being built that would soon become symbols of the problem with public housing. One was Pruitt-Igoe in St Louis, advertised as a paradise of “bright new buildings with spacious grounds” when it opened in 1954, but already by the mid-1970s crime-ridden, half-deserted and barely fit for habitation.

Public housing officials came to see the problems associated with the projects as the “concentrated effects of poverty”, says Goetz – problems that could be solved by creating mixed-income communities where public housing residents lived among wealthier neighbours.

“At least that was the prevailing theory,” says Goetz. “Other things were involved, including the revival of the real estate markets in central city areas.”

In 1992, housing officials began receiving government grants to tear down and replace the worst public housing complexes. Housing agencies had demolished or otherwise got rid of 285,000 homes by 2012 and replaced only about a sixth, according to a report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a Washington-based research institute.

Another 42,000 units have been lost since then, government figures suggest, leaving the volume of public housing at a level last seen in the 1970s.

David Layfield, an affordable housing expert, says it is important to remember that many of the projects being demolished have been largely abandoned – with vacancy rates of up to 30% in some places – because they were so uninhabitable.

“The reality is that public housing is being improved drastically – being made more durable and more energy efficient,” he says. “And in many cases the developers have diversified the income levels.”

Amid stories of trees growing through the living rooms of crumbling properties and residents being attacked outside their homes, many residents of Barry Farm welcome a new start. However, some are determined to fight the development.

“The process of transformation looks good on paper but across the country it has not worked and it is not going to work here,” says Phyllissa Bilal.

One of the main concerns is that current residents will not be able to return once the site is redeveloped.

This isn’t the perfect place but at the same time this is still my home,” says Paulette Matthews, who has lived at Barry Farm since 1995. “When you take people out of these places where are they going to end up?”

Developers are required by law to help residents relocate during the demolition and construction process, and on paper they have a right to return to the redeveloped property – but on average, it has been estimated, only one in three do.

People often “fall out of the system”, says Goetz. “Much too little is done to make sure original residents really benefit.”

The housing authority in Washington DC says that all the public housing homes on Barry Farm will be replaced on a one-to-one basis and it has offered to help current residents move to alternative public housing projects, apply for government subsidies to pay for private rentals or try to buy their own home.

Projects such as Pruitt-Igoe collapsed “badly and quickly”, says Ed Goetz, leading popular consensus to view the whole public housing programme as a “spectacular failure”.

Crime is one yardstick by which that failure has been measured. One study by the US Department of Justice found the number of violent offences committed every year between 1986 and 1989 in housing projects in Washington DC was almost double that in nearby neighbourhoods – 41 crimes per 1,000 residents, compared to 23. Another study, carried out in 1994, found that nearly 30% of residents living in one public housing project in Chicago said a bullet had been shot into their home in the previous 12 months.

But Paulette Matthews says local turf wars and the existence of gangs make moving between public housing projects dangerous.

Meanwhile Phyllissa Bilal says people are “fearful… in a constant state of trauma” because of the high levels of homelessness they see around them. It is not a fate they want to share.

By one estimate 3.5 million people in the US experience a period of homelessness in any given year. Another report has calculated that the US lacks 7.2 million affordable homes needed to house extremely low-income households. And even though hundreds of thousands of people are on waiting lists for public housing, the construction of additional publicly subsidised homes is seen as unlikely.

“There are very different perspectives in the US on how you help people who are in poverty,” says David Layfield, who set up a website to help people find available spaces.

“There is a group of people who believe that you don’t need to give a poor person anything, you just need to teach them how to work.

“We have a dysfunctional government in the US with two very strong policy divides… How do you get them to agree that a basic resource such as housing is necessary?”

 

‘Erdogan busily turning Turkey into police state’

April 15, 2016

RT

Ankara’s crackdown on critical media points to the Turkish President wanting to turn the country into a “kind of Ottoman Empire,” former US diplomat Jim Jatras told RT. The West is silent on the matter as it is afraid of his aggressive behavior, he said.

The Turkish government has blocked access to the Turkish-language version of Russia’s Sputnik news agency website. According to Sputnik’s bureau chief in Turkey, no prior warning was given to the agency by the Turkish authorities

The administration under President Erdogan has struck down on a number of Turkish media outlets critical of the government, such as Today’s Zaman newspaper whose office was raided in March.

RT: How would you describe the situation regarding freedom of the press in Turkey?

Jim Jatras: Obviously, it’s going downhill very quickly. We’ve seen the takeover of newspapers that have been reporting truthful information about the Turkish government’s relationship with ISIS and other terrorist groups within Syria.

I think it’s pretty clear that Mr. Erdogan is busily turning Turkey into a police state, even if he stokes what is approaching a civil war atmosphere within his country. There’s a flip-side of this, too, and that is that there’s a double standard I think when it comes to Russia and the Russian media, that if this were being done to a Western outlet, there would be an outcry, but because it’s Sputnik, and because it’s Russian, the same standard doesn’t seem to apply.

RT: Is Turkey becoming a more authoritarian state?

JJ: Yes, it is. Let’s be honest, under Kemalism, the secular ideology that ruled Turkey for many years it wasn’t a fully democratic state – there were a lot of violations of human rights. But I don’t think there was anything comparable to what we’re seeing now with Mr. Erdogan and his vision of turning Turkey into a kind of a neo- Ottoman Empire with an Islamist ideology and a regional power that has aggressive relations with its neighbors in the Balkans, in the Caucasus, and, of course, very much so – in Syria. So this is a very dangerous combination of circumstances.

Steven Ellis from the International Press Institute commented on Turkey shutting down Sputnik website: “These are disappointing actions but not entirely surprising. Turkey’s law gives the authorities the ability to shut down websites for fairly broad grounds like national security, the prevention of crime. It’s not clear why the Sputnik website has been shut down at this point. But given that Turkey has shut down thousands and thousands of websites in the past few years, especially since this law came into practice last year. But that isn’t surprising that they will find some reason to shut down a website if there is criticism coming that is not welcomed.”

Q

RT: Even foreign comedians and journalists, as we saw in Germany just this week, are not safe from persecution. What is making Ankara so insecure here?

JJ: To tell the truth, I don’t think its so much insecurity, I think it’s a question that Erdogan knows what he wants to do: he wants to be a master of all his surveys. I think the question you raised about the comedian, a German comedian, is quite indicative. Look at how the European media, particularly, Germany and Chancellor Angela Merkel have kowtowed to ‘Sultan’ Erdogan on the question of the migrant crisis throwing billions of euro at him in the hopes and, frankly, false promise that he will do something to stem the flow. I think he knows very much what he is doing.

Erol Onderoglu, the Turkey representative of Reporters Without Borders, told RT: “I think it appears to be like an answer to the diplomatic tension between Turkey and Russia. It is a very bad idea to interfere into the media circles.”

Q

RT: What’s been the reaction from Turkey’s closes allies? Have they condemned the media crackdown?

JJ: As far as I can tell, the criticism has been rather muted, but nothing serious. Again, nothing of the sort that would be leveled against Russia if Russia engaged in this kind of behavior.

I think that they know that Erdogan has them in a very weak position, particularly, the European allies, and frankly, even the Americans. Our government is afraid of his behavior because as we know about his aggressive behavior in Syria: he’s always threatening to invoke Article 5 and drag us directly into the Syrian conflict. He really has many angles to play here.

 

Russia, US play blame game over ‘Panama Papers’

While President Vladimir Putin is singing praises about his friend, the world’s richest cellist, we haven’t heard the last note on the “Panama Papers” yet. As Fiona Clark reports, conspiracy theories still abound.

April 15, 2016

DW

Before you get your hopes up I’ll be straight with you: there will be no mention in this piece of the Illuminati or George Soros (except for here), or any of the other more bizarre conspiracy theories concerning who leaked the “Panama Papers” and their ultimate evil intentions. And as disappointing as that may be, there is a good reason for that – they simply aren’t needed. Russia and various US institutions are creating enough of their own to keep everyone well and truly occupied.

Just in case you’d forgotten, among the 11.5 million leaked documents were papers that implicated one of Vladimir Putin’s closest friends, Sergei Roldugin, in an intricate web of companies that were involved in some allegedly dodgy looking deals worth around $2 billion (1.7 billion euros).

The papers lead to conclusions by those who analyzed them that Roldugin, a professional cellist, was earning about £6.5 million (8.1 million euros, $9.2 million) a year and had around £19 million in a Swiss bank.

Initially the Kremlin said the leaks were a CIA-backed plot aimed at undermining the Russia and the president in particular, in the lead up to next year’s elections.

Practically a saint

What Putin didn’t deny was his friend’s involvement. In the interests of openness and transparency, Putin said it was true, Roldugin is indeed a rich man – and he does have offshore accounts. But he is not a criminal – far from it – the world’s richest cellist is practically a saint. He had been given all his money by wealthy friends and had used it to buy musical instruments for Russia. And apparently he had spent all of it and was now in debt.

“Sergey Pavlovich [Roldugin] has nothing anymore because he spent more funds than he had to purchase these instruments and was left indebted to entities through which he purchased them,” Putin said at his annual televised Q&A session where he answered questions from the public. Putin added the musician was in the process of transferring ownership of these instruments to the state.

Before you start calculating how many cellos you can buy for $2 billion, the president explained that one of the instruments was worth $12 million – a rare and unique instrument indeed. But $12 million out of $2 billion would still mean you’d need an awful lot of shipping containers to bring the rest of the instruments to the motherland, and it certainly doesn’t explain where they came from or exactly which lucky students will be playing them all.

Philanthropy aside, the president went on to describe who he now believed was ‘John Doe’ – the missing link or source of the leaks. Goldman Sachs. Yes, not George Soros or the Illuminate, (ooops, I mentioned them again) but the New York-based investment bank. Why? Well that’s not important – or at least not given, but his evidence is that Goldman Sachs is a part owner of the media group that owns the Süddeutsche Zeitung – the German newspaper that was first given the leaks. The Kremlin has since issued an apology to Süddeutsche over Putin’s erroneous remarks, however the incident once again highlights how conspiracy theories are making the rounds.

Case closed?

Meanwhile, back in the US, the Brookings Institute has been cooking up its own theories. Clifford G. Gaddy, Senior Fellow at its Center on the United States and Europe, thinks John Doe is none other than the Russian president himself. According to Gaddy, Putin collated the documents via “the Russian Financial Monitoring Service (RFM).” RFM is Putin’s personal financial intelligence unit – he created it and it answers only to him. “It is … widely recognized as the most powerful such agency in the world, with a monopoly on information about money laundering, offshore centers, and related issues involving Russia or Russian nationals,” Gaddy wrote.

And, while the leaks implicated leaders and businessmen from most parts of the world, they were suspiciously quiet when it came to American offshore interests. Why? Because what’s not leaked is more important. It will be used to blackmail Americans and control the country, Gaddy exposes.

“You reveal secrets in order to destroy; conceal in order to control. Putin is not a destroyer. He’s a controller,” he wrote.

Ingenious indeed. After all it’s obviously so much easier to collate 11.5 million documents than it is to use those old fashioned ploys like photo-shopping someone with a prostitute.

 

Hidden Treasures: An Enlarged Panama Papers List

by Harry von Johnston, PhD

 

The entities who engineered the capture and dispersal of the so-called ‘Panama Papers’ did so to attack their personal enemies and for political reasons.

One American governmental agency and two wealthy American businessmen were involved. But for some astonishing reason, they left off all their friends and various politicians and corporations they either owned or had friendly relations with.

Unfortunately for their plans, some of the hack workers also downloaded everyone involved, including the forbidden ones.

Copies of these lists are being circulated, but not from friendly holders. The entire unredacted list is now available and here is a small portion of it.

There are military leaders, bankers and politicians in a number of countries who are laboring under the misapprehension that they are safe.

They are not.

 

32 KB

Abdessalam-Bouchouarebdoc1r-cpi-16-0403.pdf

2

432 KB

Abu-Ragheb-Alidoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

588 KB

Abu-Ragheb-Alidoc2-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

251 KB

Abu-Ragheb-Alidoc3-cpi-16-0329.pdf

2

27 KB

Abu-Ragheb-Alidoc4-cpi-16-0318.pdf

1

29 KB

Abu-Ragheb-Alidoc5-cpi-16-0322.pdf

2

660 KB

Abu-Ragheb-Alidoc6-cpi-16-0318.pdf

2

321 KB

Peter-W-Adamsdoc4-cpi-14-0365.pdf

2

560 KB

Adelson-Sheldon 5-cpi-16-0340.pdf

1

480 KB

Alexander-Lamar4-cpi-14-0321.pdf

42 KB

Jay-Allen5-cpi-16-0348.pdf-14

1

48 KB

Al-Mirghani-Ahmaddoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

2

447 KB

Al-Mirghani-Ahmaddoc2-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

229 KB

Al-Nahyandoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

4

97 KB

Al-Nahyandoc2-cpi-16-0402.pdf

6

1733 KB

Al-Nahyandoc3-cpi-16-0330.pdf

2

31 KB

Al-Nahyandoc4-cpi-16-0402.pdf

5

116 KB

Al-Nahyandoc5-cpi-16-0401.pdf

1

29 KB

Al-Saud-Mohammaddoc2-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

325 KB

Al-Saud-Mohammaddoc3-16-0329.pdf

1

329 KB

Al-Thani-Hamaddoc1-cpi-16-0328.pdf

1

322 KB

Al-Thani-Hamaddoc3-cpi-16-0328.pdf

1

308 KB

Al-Thani-Hamaddoc4-cpi-16-0318.pdf

1

179 KB

Al-Thani-Hamaddoc5-cpi-16-0328.pdf

9

111 KB

Aliyev-Familydoc2r-cpi-16-0403.pdf

5

175 KB

Aliyev-Familydoc3-cpi-16-0322.pdf

2

770 KB

Aliyev-Nuralidoc1-cpi-16-0403.pdf

1

30 KB

Aliyev-Nuralidoc2-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

155 KB

Allawi-Ayaddoc2-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

200 KB

Allawi-Ayaddoc3-cpi-16-0322.pdf

3

396 KB

Allawi-Ayaddoc4-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

41 KB

Allawi-Ayaddoc5-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

117 KB

Almeyda-Cesardoc1-cpi-16-0328.pdf

1

10 KB

Almeyda-Cesardoc2-cpi-16-0328.pdf

1

201 KB

Ametchi-Jean-Claudedoc1-cpi-16-0401.pdf

1

Amling-Jeffery2-cpi-16-0203.pdf

6

96 KB

Annan-Kojodoc1re-cpi-16-0403.pdf

1

308 KB

Arbusto-doc2re-1cpi-16-0458.pdf

8

166 KB

Ashcroft-Michaeldoc2re-1-cpi-16-0403.pdf

7

35 KB

Barbour-Haleydoc2-cpi-16-0302.pdf

4

6795 KB

Benediktsson-Bjarnidoc1r-cpi-16-0403.pdf

2

15 KB

Black-Daviddoc1-cpi-16-0223.pdf

3

398 KB

Blankfein-Lloyddoc2-cpi-16-0412.pdf

4

62 KB

Boozman-Johndoc1-cpi-16-0321.pdf

1

527 KB

Borbon-Pilardoc2-cpi-16-0316.pdf

1

410 KB

Botelho-Josedoc1-cpi-16-0330.pdf

2

47 KB

Burd -Stevendoc1-cpi-16-0347.pdf

1

15 KB

Burdick-Rogerdoc2-cpi-16-0320.pdf

1

962 KB

Cahuzac-Jeromedoc1-cpi-16-0328.pdf

1

49 KB

Cahuzac-Jeromedoc2-cpi-16-0328.pdf

1

73 KB

Cameron-Iandoc1-cpi-16-0330.pdf

15

1362 KB

Cameron-Iandoc2-cpi-16-0330.pdf

78

139 KB

Cayne-Jamesdoc1-cpi-16-0226.pdf

1

293 KB

Chiriboga-Galodoc1-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

248 KB

Chiriboga-Galodoc2-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

190 KB

Christensen-Richarddoc1-cpi-16-0676.pdf

1

675 KB

Clinton-Williamdoc1-cpi-16-0148.pdf

2

102 KB

Cohen-Daviddoc1-cpi-16-0229.pdf

1

75 KB

Corker-Robertdoc2-cpi-16-0239.pdf

1

175 KB

Crapo-Michaeldoc1-cpi-16-0729.pdf

1

49 KB

Cruz-Teddoc1-cpi-16-0140.pdf

2

590 KB

De-Oliveira-Idaleciodoc2-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

117 KB

Delgado-Pedrodoc1-cpi-16-0330.pdf

16

5248 KB

Devillers-Patrickdoc1-cpi-16-0402.pdf

1

19 KB

Domecq-Micaeladoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

5

768 KB

El-Majidi-Mohammeddoc1-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

396 KB

Emir-of-Qatardoc1-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

67 KB

Eismann-Danieldoc2-cpi-16-0893-pdf

2

128 KB

Fannin-Robertdoc1-cpi-16-0112.pdf

1

410 KB

Fink-Richarddoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

283 KB

Francolini-Riccardodoc1-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

458 KB

Graham-Phillipdoc1-cpi-16-0396.pdf

2

122 KB

Grano-Josephdoc2-cpi-16-0224.pdf

1

40 KB

Grindetti-Nestordoc1r-cpi-16-0402.pdf

1

287 KB

Guerra-Daviddoc1-cpi-16-0315.pdf

1

80 KB

Gunnlaugsson-Singurlagdoc2-cpi-16-0330.pdf

2

1381 KB

Gunnlaugsson-Singurlagdoc3-cpi-16-0330.pdf

2

1470 KB

Gutierrez-Carlosdoc1-16-0330.pdf

7

182 KB

Gutierrez-Carlosdoc2-cpi-16-0330.pdf

2

56 KB

Hance-Jamesdoc1-cpi-16-0722.pdf

1

98 KB

Haynes-Lansingdoc2-cpi-16-0335.pdf

1

56 KB

Hinojosa-Juan-Armandodoc1-cpi-16-0330.pdf

2

78 KB

Horton-Joeldoc1-cpi-16-0571.pdf

1

37 KB

Horvath-Zsoltdoc1-cpi-16-0321.pdf

1

22 KB

Horvath-Zsoltdoc2-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

345 KB

Horvath-Zsoltdoc3-cpi-16-0329.pdf

2

172 KB

Hurtgen-Nicholasdoc2-cpi-16-0784.pdf

1

91 KB

Ibori-Jamesdoc1-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

41 KB

Ibori-Jamesdoc2-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

374 KB

Ibori-Jamesdoc3-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

367 KB

Inhofe-Jamesdoc1-cpi-16-0551.pdf

2

62 KB

Itoua-Brunodoc1-cpi-16-0316.pdf

1

977 KB

Itoua-Brunodoc2-cpi-16-0318.pdf

1

30 KB

Itoua-Brunodoc3-cpi-16-0328.pdf

1

80 KB

Ivanishvili-Bidzinadoc1-cpi-16-0318.pdf

1

25 KB

Jiagui-Dengdoc1-cpi-16-0331.pdf

1

237 KB

Johnson Robertdoc1-cpi-16-0263.pdf

2

340 KB

Jones-Robertdoc2-cpi-16-0226.pdf

1

320 KB

Warren-Jonesdoc1-cpi-16-0587.pdf

1

71 KB

Kejriwal-Anuragdoc1-cpi-16-0330.pdf

3

108 KB

Kejriwal-Anuragdoc2-cpi-16-0330.pdf

3

108 KB

Kejriwal-Anuragdoc3-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

258 KB

Kejriwal-Anuragdoc4-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

112 KB

Kejriwal-Anuragdoc5-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

15 KB

Kejriwal-Anuragdoc7-16-0330.pdf

1

89 KB

King-Al-Saud-Salmandoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

2

186 KB

Kirby-Iandoc1-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

9 KB

Kuffuor-Johndoc1-cpi-16-0328.pdf

1

28 KB

Kuffuor-Johndoc2-cpi-16-0403.pdf

2

660 KB

Kyungu-Jaynetdoc1-cpi-16-0328.pdf

3

32 KB

Kyungu-Jaynetdoc2-cpi-16-0403.pdf

2

134 KB

Labrador-Rauldoc1-cpi-16-0549.pdf

2

628 KB

LaKritz-Robdoc1-cpi-16-0821.pdf

2

436 KB

Lazarenko-Pavlodoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

2

55 KB

Lazarenko-Pavlodoc2-cpi-16-0329.pdf

2

54 KB

Lazarenko-Pavlodoc3-cpi-16-0329.pdf

2

54 KB

Li-Jasminedoc1-cpi-16-0331.pdf

2

174 KB

Little-Jackdoc1-cpi-16-0271.pdf

1

78 KB

Lodge-Edwarddoc3-cpi-16-0442.pdf

1

148 KB

Luster-Johndoc1-cpi-16-0389.pdf

1

104 KB

Lyra-Joaodoc1-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

109 KB

Macri-Mauriciodoc1-cpi-16-0318.pdf

1

69 KB

Makhlouf-Rami-Hafezdoc2-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

33 KB

Makhlouf-Rami-Hafezdoc3-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

230 KB

Makhlouf-Rami-Hafezdoc4-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

256 KB

Makhlouf-Rami-Hafezdoc5-cpi-16-0401.pdf

1

157 KB

Makhlouf-Rami-Hafezdoc6-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

246 KB

Makhlouf-Rami-Hafezdoc7-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

175 KB

Makhlouf-Rami-Hafezdoc8-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

39 KB

Makhlouf-Rami-Hafezdoc9-cpi-16-0330.pdf

2

1052 KB

Mates-Michaeldoc1-cpi-16-0331.pdf

20

874 KB

McHugh-Barrydoc1-cpi-16-0843.pdf

2

363 KB

McCain-Johndoc1-cpi-16-0628.pdf

2

82 KB

Miller-Tyreedoc3-cpi-16-0733.pdf

1

665 KB

Mizzi-Konraddoc1r-cpi-16-0403.pdf

1

822 KB

Mizzi-Konraddoc2-cpi-16-0322.pdf

19

4013 KB

Molina-Javierdoc1-cpi-16-0322.pdf

17

7552 KB

Molina-Javierdoc2-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

116 KB

Mubarak-Alaadoc1-cpi-16-0330.pdf

3

1086 KB

Mubarak-Alaadoc2-cpi-16-0318.pdf

3

46 KB

Mubarak-Alaadoc3-cpi-16-0328.pdf

1

188 KB

Munoz-Hector-Danieldoc1-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

1087 KB

Munoz-Hector-Danieldoc2-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

790 KB

Munoz-Hector-Danieldoc3-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

329 KB

Murray-Palmerdoc2-cpi-16-0113.pdf

2

797 KB

Mustafa-Mohammaddoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

199 KB

Nazifuddin-Mohddoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

101 KB

Nazifuddin-Mohddoc2-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

290 KB

Nazifuddin-Mohddoc4-cpi-16-0401.pdf

2

1837 KB

Nazifuddin-Mohddoc7-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

108 KB

Nazifuddin-Mohddoc8-cpi-16-0329.pdf

2

363 KB

Ndahiro-Emmanueldoc1-16-0328.pdf

1

35 KB

Nicosia-Giuseppedoc1-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

159 KB

Nicosia-Giuseppedoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

113 KB

Nordal-Olofdoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

4

1148 KB

Nordal-Olofdoc2r-cpi-16-0403.pdf

9

321 KB

O’Neal-Stanleydoc1-cpi-16-0790.pdf

1

2184 KB

Ovalle-Alfredodoc1-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

23 KB

Ovalle-Alfredodoc2-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

80 KB

Ovalle-Alfredodoc3-cpi-16-0322.pdf

2

125 KB

Papastavrou-Stavrosdoc1-cpi-16-0401.pdf

3

732 KB

Papastavrou-Stavrosdoc2-cpi-16-0328.pdf

3

360 KB

Papastavrou-Stavrosdoc3-cpi-16-0401.pdf

3

813 KB

Papastavrou-Stavrosdoc4-cpi-16-0328.pdf

3

366 KB

Papastavrou-Stavrosdoc5-cpi-16-0328.pdf

2

132 KB

Paulson-Henrydoc1-cpi-16-0197.pdf

2

658 KB

Piskorski-Paweldoc1-cpi-16-0321.pdf

1

228 KB

Piskorski-Paweldoc3-cpi-16-0321.pdf

1

228 KB

Poroshenko-Petrodoc1-cpi-16-0316.pdf

1

22 KB

Poroshenko-Petrodoc2-cpi-16-0318.pdf

1

864 KB

Poroshenko-Petrodoc3-cpi-16-0316.pdf

1

277 KB

Pouye-Mamadoudoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

82 KB

Rawal-Kalpanadoc1-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

50 KB

Rawal-Kalpanadoc2-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

49 KB

Rawal-Kalpanadoc3-cpi-16-0329.pdf

1

370 KB

Rawal-Kalpanadoc4-cpi-16-0331.pdf

1

230 KB

Renyi-Thomasdoc2-cpi-16-0937.pdf

2

79 KB

Reynolds-Thomasdoc1-cpi-16-0142.pdf

1

321 KB

Robnett-Pauldoc1-cpi-16-0702.pdf

1

45 KB

Roldugin-Sergeidoc1-cpi-16-0403.pdf

1

24 KB

Rosenthal-Cesardoc2-cpi-16-0330.pdf

5

400 KB

Rotenberg-Brothersdoc1-cpi-16-0403.pdf

22

273 KB

Rubio-Marcodoc1-cpi-16-0072.pdf

1

63 KB

Saraki-Toyindoc2-cpi-16-0330.pdf

1

16 KB

Shansonga-Attandoc1-cpi-16-0331.pdf

17

2444 KB

Shansonga-Attandoc2r-cpi-16-0403.pdf

2

745 KB

Sharif-familydoc1-cpi-16-0331.pdf

2

46 KB

Sharif-familydoc2-cpi-16-0330.pdf

2

417 KB

Sharif-familydoc5-cpi-16-0319.pdf

1

223 KB

Sharples-Pameladoc1-cpi-16-0321.pdf

1

86 KB

Seidenberg-Ivandoc1-cpi-16-0328.pdf

2

178 KB

Simpson-Benjamindoc2-cpi-16-0185.pdf

1

79 KB

Strauss-Theodoredoc 2-cpi-16-0268.pdf

2

43 KB

Thompson Kennedydoc1-cpi-16-0071.pdf

1

46 KB

Toure-Mamadiedoc1-cpi-16-0328.pdf

2

966 KB

Villanueva-Jesusdoc1-cpi-16-0322.pdf

3

33 KB

Villanueva-Jesusdoc2-cpi-16-0322.pdf

2

716 KB

Vong-Vathana-Angdoc1-cpi-16-0405.pdf

4

287 KB

Walker-Georgedoc1-cpi-16-0311.pdf

1

70 KB

Xiaolin-Lidoc1-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

54 KB

Xiaolin-Lidoc2-cpi-16-0322.pdf

1

 

[D1]

No responses yet

Leave a Reply