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TBR News December 7, 2010

Dec 07 2010

Washington, D.C., December 7, 2010: “From the vitally important WikiLeaks diplomatic cables we learn that, by order of the Secretary of State, Hilary Clinton, American diplomats assigned to the United Nations were instructed to “collect DNA samples, fingerprints and credit card” details on specific UN officials who had proven to be hostile to Washington’s international activities.

The purpose of this project was to produce documentation, in official agency offices, so that these UN people could be set up. A credit card, a valid copy of a target, could, for example, be used to buy male pornography or hire a rent boy.

It is known how to take a fingerprint and make a latex duplicate and affix this to a medical glove. Such fingerprints could be left at the scene of a crime, such as the murder of a prostitute, and then blame would at once fall on the target diplomat. As many of these have immunity, they could be charged, declared png (persona no grata) and shipped out of the country.

Poor Hilary. Her family is Jewish (from Poland) and she became interested in both Communism and blacks while at the Yale Law School in 1969. Following graduation, Hilary interned at the Oakland, California Law Office of Treuhaft, Walker and Burnstein.

Bob Treuhaft was a life-long Communist and his firm handled Black Panther matters. Hilary was put in charge of this section and in 1971 during a Panther militant demonstration in Sacramento when Panthers carried weapons into the State offices, subsequent state police raids on the Panthers visiting the capitol caught Hilary and a female Black Panther naked in the same bed on a motel raid. When her husband became President, the police records of this incident were sequestered by the FBI but not before Xerox copies had been made.

Just something of interest here but probably overshadowed by revelations of the amoral plottings of our government all over the world.

And closer to home, it might be of some interest to note that the U.S. Army has drawn up plans and is now making initial preparations for an invasion of Mexico!

It is not a secret that powerful and vicious Mexican drug gangs have taken over complete control of the Mexican-American border and that the central government in Mexico City has lost all control over their armed forces and police. The drug gangs have been sending armed convoys over the border in sparsely settled Arizona and have been bringing in literally tons of marijuana and lesser amounts of more valuable cocaine.

Since these armed criminals will shoot to kill any person or persons who attempt to halt them, to include local law enforcement and, most important, U.S. Army units. Fort Huachuca, an important Army intelligence base, has been overrun with these incursions and when challenged by MPs, the drug people open fire on them. The plan is to send strike forces across the border, several hundred miles south of the border and then regroup and return to the border in force. They will be supported by more Army units on the American side of the border and the drive to the north by Special Forces supplied with armor, will be to “Encounter, engage and destroy” any and all drug people. There would, of course, be civilian casualties but these are considered “minimal” in the execution.

Weeping liberals, to include the useless President, will no doubt wail at the bloody carnage but the benefits to America will far outweigh their crocodile tears.”

Support WikiLeaks and Julian Assange!

December 6, 2010-

by Dave Lindorff

This Can’t Be Haspening

WikiLeaks is under concerted attack from the US government.

It is increasingly clear that the “rape” charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange are trumped-up affairs resulting from pressure by the US government and intelligence agencies on Swedish authorities. The main allegation of rape is being made by a Swedish woman, Anna Ardin, who admits she had consensual sex with Assange, but claims he failed to halt their love-making when a condom allegedly failed. Calling such a situation “rape”–if it even happened–makes a mockery of the term.

The idea of an international arrest warrant through Interpol on such a thin charge is an insult to all the victims of real rape whose cases in the US and elsewhere around the world are regularly left unprosecuted. In addition, the woman making the allegation has a connection to anti-Castro organizations and a brother in Swedish intelligence who was a liason in Washington to US intelligence services, raising further questions about the whole “incident.” A second woman’s charges against Assange are even more specious.

For a great expose of the sham charges of rape, read this article in the San Francisco Chronicle, which points out that Swedish law, which essentially makes having sex without a condom a legal form of rape, even if consensually done, is about to make that country a “laughing stock,” which shows that Ardin threw a party for Assange the day after the alleged “rape”, and which also shows that both women were boasting on line about their “conquests” of Assange after the alleged “violations” occurred.

The Obama administration has sunk to a new low in pursuing Assange, and is now having its so-called Justice Department try to manufacture a crime with which to prosecute Assange for doing precisely what real journalists should have been doing–namely exposing the criminal activities of the US government in engaging in acts of wars in countries like Yemen and Pakistan where the US is not legally at war, in pressuring foreign allies like Spain on behalf of US companies, in trying to trump up arguments to attack Iran with false information about alleged importation of long-range missiles from North Korea, etc.

The US is almost certainly also behind efforts to shut down WikiLeaks by closing down its DNS account, by attacking its servers through sophisticated hacking techniques, and by putting pressure on banks and payment systems like Paypal to get them to stop handling donations of support. Paypal, for instance, which was a major vehicle for donating to WikiLeaks, suddenly cut off the organization, saying it had violated Paypal policies by engaging in “illegal” activity, though nothing that WikiLeaks has done has violated any law. The hand of the US government is clearly visible in this decision too.

WikiLeaks has currently found a new home at www.WikiLeaks.ch, thanks to the Pirate Party, a small independent political organization in Switzerland committed to freedom of information. Go there to make a donation of support, which can still be accomplished by credit card through an online transaction at a Swiss bank, or by wire transfer.

The 9/11 of American Diplomacy
December 2, 2010
By Patrick J. Buchanan
http://www.vdare.com/buchanan/101202_american_diplomacy.htm


Not since Leon Trotsky began publishing the secrets of the Romanov archives in 1918 has there been a more devastating leak of diplomatic documents than this week’s WikiLeaks dump.

The Romanov files contained the secret treaties the imperial Allies had signed to carve up the Hohenzollern, Habsburg and Ottoman empires after a war fought “to make the world safe for democracy.”

It was to counter cynicism after revelation of these “secret treaties” that Woodrow Wilson called for “open covenants, openly arrived at.”

In 1898, a leaked document inflamed America and infuriated President McKinley, who had not wanted to go to war with Spain.

The Spanish minister in Washington, Enrique Dupuy De Lome, had written an indiscreet letter that was stolen by a sympathizer of the Cuban revolution and leaked to William Randolph Hearst’s warmongering New York Journal. In the De Lome letter, the minister had said of McKinley that he is “weak, and a bidder for the admiration of the crowd, besides being a … politician who tries to leave a door open behind himself while keeping on good terms with the jingoes of his party.”

Six days later, the battleship Maine blew up in Havana harbor. Hearst’s Journal screamed Spanish “treachery.” And the war was on.

On Jan. 16, 1917, the German Foreign Secretary Zimmermann had cabled his envoy in Mexico City to convey an offer. If Mexico would join Germany in a war against the United States, Mexico’s reward would be Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.

Written in code, the Zimmermann telegram was intercepted and deciphered by the British, who happily turned it over to the Americans.

The U.S. reaction was even more explosive than it had been to news that Germany had declared open season for U-boats on all ships carrying cargo to Allied ports, including American ships.

Within weeks, America was at war with Germany.

The WikiLeaks dump comes in an age where diplomatic insults are common. Hence, nothing so dramatic as war is likely to result.

Still, this is a diplomatic disaster of the first order.

For what it reveals is that the world’s last superpower cannot be trusted with diplomatic confidences or secrets. Try to help the Americans, and what you tell them may wind up on page one of their tabloid press.

From what has spilled out already, the Iranians know exactly who in the Arab world is goading us to attack their country.

That list includes Persian Gulf sheiks, the king of Saudi Arabia and young Prime Minister Saad Hariri of Lebanon, whose father, former Prime Minister Rafic Hariri, was assassinated five years ago, allegedly by Hezbollah, Iran’s ally.

All these Arab friends of America, especially Hariri, have now been put at risk of reprisal and possible assassination. Our diplomats in whom those rulers put their trust have been compromised.

The press has not yet revealed our confidential sources, but foreign intelligence agencies by now have the unedited documents and can figure out who is talking to the Americans and who is not a friend.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai, a prickly ally, but one on whom we have to depend in a war that has cost 1,400 American lives, now has confirmation of what we think of him. If he is thinking of cutting a deal at America’s expense, who can blame him?

Secretary of State Clinton, who has made a favorable impression on foreign leaders, comes off as mildly paranoid with her instructions to have U.S. diplomats spy on and steal credit card numbers of allied diplomats at the United Nations.

Because of these leaks, many U.S. diplomats, who were candid about leaders in the capitals where they represent our country, will see their usefulness diminished or destroyed.
As these documents have apparently come out of Pentagon files, what does that tell us about the U.S. military’s ability to keep a secret? Are U.S. battle and war plans also unprotected?
How is it that, thus far, only PFC Bradley Manning has been apprehended?

Who vetted Manning? Is it possible one 22-year-old with a computer and disks can get access to, download and transfer to anti-Americans the entire correspondence of the Department of State with U.S. embassies?

Some 250,000 documents — thousands classified as confidential, secret and “no foreign” distribution — were thieved.

Who was in charge of securing those secrets? Why have heads not rolled? What has happened to the idea of accountability?

A few years ago, a leak of the name of a single CIA analyst, Valerie Plame, had the national press in an uproar, with a grand jury impaneled and a special prosecutor, Patrick Fitzgerald, named to investigate the leak right up to and into the Oval Office, if necessary.

Vice President Cheney’s aide, Scooter Libby, was prosecuted for lying about the leak. Karl Rove was hauled repeatedly before a grand jury.

Why is the Obama White House getting a pass when this national humiliation and diplomatic Pearl Harbor occurred on its watch?

Patrick J. Buchanan needs no introduction

US poll: Congressmen least honest
December 4, 2010

Press TV:

The most recent Gallup poll has asked Americans about what kind of professionals they think are the most honest and ethical.

The survey shows that US Congressmen, car salesmen and lobbyists are seen as the least honest and most unethical people in America today, according to AFP.

57 percent of those surveyed also rate the ethical standards of Congressmen as low to very low.

Meanwhile, only nine percent think highly of US lawmakers.

Members of Congress’ ratings have never been high, but their recent ratings rank among the worst in the more than 30-year history of Gallup’s honesty and ethics question.

Honesty and ethical ratings of the clergy remain very low, compared with what they were prior to the Catholic priest sex-abuse revelations in the early 2000s.

Gallup has conducted the annual study since 1991.

Nurses continue to top the list, with 81 percent of those surveyed giving them a very high ethics rating.

The consistently most positively rated professions, including nurses and pharmacists, have generally been able to avoid widespread scandals and, as such, Americans continue to hold them in the highest regard.

Survey results are based on telephone interviews with 1,000 adults.

Nurses were first included in the Gallup poll in 1999 and have received the highest ranking every year except 2001, when firefighters took first place.

MAG/MGH/HRF

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/153796.html

Massive Release of Raw WikiLeaks Files Threatened if Assange Harmed

by Theunis Bates

Julian Assange’s lawyer has warned that supporters of the WikiLeaks founder will unleash a “thermonuclear device” of government files containing the names of spies, sources and informants if he’s killed or brought to trial.

Assange, the 39-year-old Australian who has most recently embarrassed the U.S. by leaking hundreds of previously secret diplomatic dispatches over the past week, has dubbed the unfiltered cache of documents his “insurance” policy. The 1.5-gigabyte file, which has been distributed to tens of thousands of fellow hackers and open-government campaigners around the world, is encrypted with a 256-digit key, reports The Sunday Times. Experts interviewed by the paper said that even powerful military computers can’t crack the encryption without the key.

Contained inside that file — named insurance.aes256 — are believed to be all of the documents that WikiLeaks has received to date, including unpublished papers on the Guantanamo Bay detention camp and papers belonging to BP and the Bank of America. Assange has previously suggested that the documents are unredacted, meaning they contain names that normally would be removed before publication to protect the lives of soldiers, spies and sources.

“We have over a long period of time distributed encrypted backups of material we have yet to release,” he told the BBC in August. “All we have to do is release the password to that material, and it is instantly available.”

Assange’s lawyer, Mark Stephens, told the BBC news program “The Andrew Marr Show” on Sunday that if the WikiLeaks website was taken down — or if anything ill happened to his client — the key to that damaging file would be released. “[WikiLeaks founders] need to protect themselves,” Stephens said, “and this is I think what they believe to be a thermonuclear device, effectively, in the electronic age.”

Stephens added that the insurance policy was vital because Assange had received numerous death threats from around the world, including one from Canadian Tom Flanagan, a former campaign manager to Prime Minister Stephen Harper. Flanagan told a TV interviewer last week that Assange “should be assassinated” and taken out “with a drone or something.” He later apologized for the remark.

Assange is believed to be hiding in Britain, where he is fighting attempts by Sweden to extradite him on sex-crime charges. His lawyer told the BBC that the legal moves against Assange were a “political stunt” and that Sweden’s chief prosecutor had dropped the case against his client in September. He said it was only “after the intervention of a Swedish politician” that another prosecutor opened a new case.

The head of the whistle-blowing website has always denied the allegations, made by two women who hosted a party for him in Stockholm in August. He has admitted having consensual sex with the women, and according to an AOL News investigation, the charges relate to disagreements over condom use.

Stephens said he was worried the attempt to extradite Assange to Sweden could be a precursor to moving him to the U.S. “It doesn’t escape my attention that Sweden was one of those lickspittle states which used its resources and its facilities for rendition flights” by the U.S. to transport terrorism suspects around the world for interrogation, he said.

Although Sarah Palin has called for Assange to be prosecuted for treason and Newt Gingrich has labeled him an “enemy combatant” who is “engaged in terrorism,” U.S. charges against the hacker are unlikely. He is not a U.S. citizen and so can’t commit treason against America. And because he didn’t steal the documents but simply released them, he would likely be protected by the Constitution’s guarantee of freedom of speech.

Don’t Look, Don’t Read: Government Warns Its Workers Away From WikiLeaks Documents

December 4, 2010

by Eric Lipton

New York Times

WASHINGTON — In a classic case of shutting the barn door after the horse has left, the Obama administration and the Department of Defense have ordered the hundreds of thousands of federal employees and contractors not to view the secret cables and other classified documents published by Wikileaks and news organizations around the world unless the workers have the required security clearance or authorization.

“Classified information, whether or not already posted on public websites or disclosed to the media, remains classified, and must be treated as such by federal employees and contractors, until it is declassified by an appropriate U.S. Government authority,” said the notice sent on Friday afternoon by the Office of Management and Budget, which is part of the White House, to agency and department heads, urging them to distribute it to their staff.

The directive applies to both government computers and private devices that employees or contractors might have, as long as they are accessing the documents on nonclassified government networks. It does not advise agencies to block WikiLeaks or other websites on government computer systems, a White House official said Saturday. And it does not prohibit federal employees from reading news stories about the topic. But if they have “accidentially” already downloaded any of these documents, they are being told to notify their “information security offices.”

The Department of Defense, in its own directive to military personnel and contractors, says that simply viewing these documents, without proper authorization, will violate long-standing rules even though they are accessible to the public at large on Internet sites.

“Viewing or downloading still classified documents from unclassified government computers creates a security violation,” a spokeswoman said in a statement on Saturday.

The effort, while understandable, seems entirely futile, said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a Washington nonprofit group that has combated government efforts to keep certain government documents secret.

“It just may be a little too late for the government to push these documents down the memory hole,” Mr. Rotenberg said, adding that his center did not support the initial public release of the material. “This is Orwell thought police in the age of the Internet, as these are already so widely accessible on servers around the world.”The Library of Congress has joined in the push, blocked visitors to its reading rooms, or anyone else using its computer system, from accessing the WikiLeaks site, noting that “unauthorized disclosures of classified documents do not alter the documents’ classified status or automatically result in declassification of the documents.”

The moves have not apparently discouraged staff at WikiLeaks, as the organization continues to post Twitter feeds mocking the efforts to limit access to the documents, including one note on Saturday reading: “Digital McCarthyism: U.S. Military Tries to Intimidate Soldiers Into Not Reading Wikileaks”.

Columbia students told job prospects harmed if they access WikiLeaks cables

US university urges caution about posting links to Wikileaks or making comments on social network sites

December 5, 2010-

by Ewen Mac Askill

The Guardian/UK

The US government’s panic over the WikiLeaks revelations is extending to American campuses, with Columbia University warning students they risk future job prospects if they download any of the material.

The university’s Office of Careers Services’s cautionary note drew criticism from observers, who expressed alarm that the liberal bastions of academe in the US would be complicit in restrictions on access to the documents.

Disclosure of the warning came in the wake of a government ban on employees, estimated at more than two-and-a-half million people, using work computers and other communication devices to look at diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks. The federal government advised employees that, though freely available on newspaper websites as well as WikiLeaks, they officially remain classified.

WikiLeaks dominated the Sunday morning talk shows, with views ranging from fears about what is still to come to calls for the Obama administration to adopt a more muscular approach.

Much of the debate centres on the need to restrict the number of people with access to classified material while avoiding a return to pre-9/11 when the number of people with such access was much more restricted.

Columbia University confirmed to the Associated Press that the Office of Career Services had emailed students at the university’s school of international and public affairs, a recruiting ground for the state department.

The office said it had received advice from an alumnus who “recommends that you do not post links to these documents nor make comments on social media sites such as Facebook or through Twitter. Engaging in these activities would call into question your ability to deal with confidential information, which is part of most positions with the federal government.”

The state department insisted no such advice had been sent out formally. Its spokesman, PJ Crowley, in an email to the Huffington Post, which had posted the Columbia University warning on its site, wrote: “This is not true. We have instructed state department employees not to access the WikiLeaks site and download posted documents using an unclassified network since these documents are still classified.”

The US social security administration has joined the list of federal departments warning its employees not to browse WikiLeaks. It says in a circular: “Despite these documents being publicly accessible over the internet, the documents remain classified and SSA employees should not access, download, or transmit them. Individuals may be subject to applicable federal criminal statutes for unlawful access to or transmission of classified information.”

The secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, back in Washington after a trip to Central Asia on which she was dogged by the WikiLeaks disclosures, attempted to laugh it off at a cultural awards ceremony. She told the audience it was extraordinary to stand in line to watch the different genres and generations pass, representing the breadth and depth of American artistry. She then joked: “I am writing a cable about it, which I’m sure you’ll find soon on your closest website.”

Columbia University Walks Back Anti-WikiLeaks Advice

December 6, 2010

by Lucia Graves

Huffington Post

WASHINGTON — Days after Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) sparked national ire by advising students not to discuss WikiLeaks on Facebook or Twitter, the school is walking back its remarks and embracing free speech.

In an email to students last week, SIPA’s Office of Career Services warned students that tweeting or posting about WikiLeaks on Facebook could endanger their job prospects with the federal government, according to an alumnus working at the U.S. State Department.

“[The alumnus] recommends that you DO NOT post links to these documents nor make comments on social media sites such as Facebook or through Twitter,” the Office of Career Services advised students in an email obtained last week by The Huffington Post. “Engaging in these activities would call into question your ability to deal with confidential information, which is part of most positions with the federal government.”

Indignant Americans took to Twitter last week to air their reactions to the prestigious institution’s chilling warning.

Over at the State Department, spokesman Philip Crowley has denied any federal involvement in the school’s guidance.

“This is not true,” he wrote in an email. “We have instructed State Department employees not to access the WikiLeaks site and download posted documents using an unclassified network since these documents are still classified. We condemn what Mr. Assange is doing, but have given no advice to anyone beyond the State Department to my knowledge.”

Now Wired‘s Sam Gustin reports that SIPA’s Dean, John H. Coatsworth, is reversing the advice issued to students last week, reaffirming the school’s commitment to freedom of speech.

Story continues below

Freedom of information and expression is a core value of our institution. Thus, SIPA’s position is that students have a right to discuss and debate any information in the public arena that they deem relevant to their studies or to their roles as global citizens, and to do so without fear of adverse consequences,” he said in an email obtained by HuffPost.

Though the disclosure of 250,000 U.S. diplomatic cables detailing some of the country’s most closely guarded secrets has received a mixed response, the move to silence public debate on the issue represents uncharted new territory in the federal government’s effort to put a stop to the leaks.

Douglas Almond, an associate professor of International and Public Affairs and Economics, told HuffPost that while students should not be discriminated against for following the WikiLeak conversation, aspiring diplomats may appreciate being notified about the issue.

“If I were a SIPA student considering a career in government, as many are, I’d want to to be made aware of this potential issue,” said Almond, who’s currently on leave at Cornell University. “That said, in my opinion it would be silly for the government to screen future job applicants based on whether they had read these leaked cables or their summaries in the press.”

Read the original email from SIPA’s Office of Career Services.

From: Office of Career Services Date: Tue, Nov 30, 2010 at 3:26 PM Subject: Wikileaks – Advice from an alum To: “Office of Career Services (OCS)”

Hi students,

We received a call today from a SIPA alumnus who is working at the State Department. He asked us to pass along the following information to anyone who will be applying for jobs in the federal government, since all would require a background investigation and in some instances a security clearance.

The documents released during the past few months through Wikileaks are still considered classified documents. He recommends that you DO NOT post links to these documents nor make comments on social media sites such as Facebook or through Twitter. Engaging in these activities would call into question your ability to deal with confidential information, which is part of most positions with the federal government.

Regards,
Office of Career Services

Below is the response from SIPA’s dean, reversing the school’s position:

Here is Coatsworth’s more recent

December 6, 2010

Dear SIPA Community,

Last Tuesday, SIPA’s Office of Career Services received a call from a former student currently employed by the U.S. Department of State who pointed out that the U.S. government documents released during the past few months through WikiLeaks are still considered classified. The caller suggested that students who will be applying for federal jobs that require background checks avoid posting links to these documents or making comments about them on social media sites such as Facebook or through Twitter.

OCS emailed this cautionary suggestion to students, as it has done many times with other information that could be helpful in seeking employment after graduation. We know that many students today share a great deal about their lives online and that employers may use that information when evaluating their candidacy. Subsequent news stories have indicated that the Department of State has issued guidelines for its own employees, but has not issued any guidelines for prospective employees.

Freedom of information and expression is a core value of our institution. Thus, SIPA’s position is that students have a right to discuss and debate any information in the public arena that they deem relevant to their studies or to their roles as global citizens, and to do so without fear of adverse consequences. The WikiLeaks documents are accessible to SIPA students (and everyone else) from a wide variety of respected sources, as are multiple means of discussion and debate both in and outside of the classroom.

Should the U.S. Department of State issue any guidelines relating to the WikiLeaks documents for prospective employees, SIPA will make them available immediately.

Sincerely,
John H. Coatsworth
Dean

Wikileaks: site list reveals US sensitivities

December 6, 2010

Of all the leaks to have emerged from this set of releases from Wikileaks, this global list of infrastructure sites which the US considers critical for its national security interest must surely count as one of the most sensitive. In its preamble, the cable from the US State Department in 2009 specifically notes it was compiled to try to protect US interests from terrorists.

In their own defence, those working with Wikileaks have pointed out that they deliberately removed details of names and locations from the secret list.

But that has not impressed those who deal with national security issues.

In London the British government condemned the leak unreservedly. The British national security adviser, Sir Peter Ricketts, has asked all government departments to review their computer security.

And Sir Paul Lever, former chair of the Joint Intelligence Committee, called the leak grossly irresponsible.

Global supply chain

But now the information is out in the public domain, it is worth considering in general terms what it tells us about what is nowadays seen as sensitive: what sort of facilities are included and – just as interesting – which ones are omitted.

First off, one must note that this is not a list of military facilities. You will not, for instance, find any mention of Diego Garcia, the US military base built on land leased from the UK in the middle of the Indian Ocean which has proved so critical for the recent conflict in Afghanistan.

Instead it is a list of key facilities which, if attacked, could disrupt the global supply chain and global communications, as well as goods and services critical to the wellbeing of the US and its economy.

What hits you first and foremost is how important on this list is the unseen network of cables that lie on the ocean bed, linking up the American continent across the Pacific Ocean to New Zealand, Australia, China and other US allies in Asia.

The fear of global pandemics or even biological warfare is a subject of considerable discussion, one presumes”

Similarly, on Europe’s coastline it is the cables that reach from the United Kingdom and Ireland northwards and stretch across the US and Canada that apparently give the US government cause to worry.

And these are not the only maritime considerations. We may operate in a new world of virtual communications, but (along with space communications no doubt) what is carried by or under water is still, it seems, essential.

High on the list of concerns are major port hubs – in China, Japan and South Korea, or critical sea lanes, like the Straits of Hormuz in the Gulf that carries so much of the world’s oil and gas supplies, and the Straits of Malacca between Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia.

The Panama Canal is mentioned. But if warmer temperatures open up the north-west and north-east passages in the Arctic, one has to wonder – for how much longer?

Pharmaceutical emphasis

Intriguingly, the Bosphorus Straits, once surely a Cold War strategic point of interest – the only exit point into the wider Mediterranean for the Soviet Black Sea Fleet – is no longer considered a priority.

Instead in Turkey and the Caucasus, it is the Baku-Tibilisi-Ceyhan pipeline that merits a mention: just one of many strategic pipelines criss-crossing Eurasia that are listed – the only reason several post-Soviet republics like Georgia, Azerbaijan and Belarus are included.

Also striking, but perhaps not surprising, is the predominance of mines that produce rare or much-needed metals which are considered worthy of protection, especially in South Africa and Australia.

The Main Leaks So Far

· Fears that terrorists may acquire Pakistani nuclear material

· Several Arab leaders urged attack on Iran over nuclear issue

· US instructs spying on key UN officials

· China’s changing ties with North Korea

· Yemen approved US strikes on militants

· Personal and embarrassing comments on world leaders

· Afghan leader Hamid Karzai freed dangerous detainees

· Russia is a “virtual mafia state” with widespread corruption and bribery

· Afghan President Hamid Karzai is “paranoid and weak”

· The extent of corruption in Afghanistan

· Chinese leadership ‘hacked Google’

· A list of key global facilities the US says are vital to its national security

Wikileaks cables: Key issues

But perhaps most surprising of all is the long list of pharmaceutical facilities in Europe that are apparently of vital importance nowadays.

Who would have guessed that it is Tamiflu and typhoid vaccines in Switzerland, anti-snake bite venom in Italy, foot and mouth vaccines in the UK and numerous drugs-making sites in Germany that make Europe worthy of so much attention from those who worry about US national security?

The fear of global pandemics or even biological warfare is a subject of considerable discussion, one presumes.

And the omissions? Perhaps the most significant is the lack of any attention to civil nuclear power plants outside of the United States. Fears about nuclear non-proliferation from rogue states continue to plague diplomats and defence strategists, of course.

But if the inference from this list is correct, it seems that when it comes to civil nuclear power, we have moved into an age of asymmetrical threats, fluid and often unpredictable.

Other potential soft targets have moved centre stage, and perhaps the days have gone when security planners believe a terrorist attack on a civil nuclear plant to wage nuclear war or cause nuclear panic is either particularly likely or necessarily globally devastating.

List of facilities ‘vital to US security’ leaked

A long list of key facilities around the world that the US describes as vital to its national security has been released by Wikileaks.

In February 2009 the State Department asked all US missions abroad to list all installations whose loss could critically affect US national security.

The list includes pipelines, communication and transport hubs.

Several UK sites are listed, including cable locations, satellite sites and BAE Systems plants.

BBC diplomatic correspondent Jonathan Marcus says this is probably the most controversial document yet from the Wikileaks organisation.

The definition of US national security revealed by the cable is broad and all embracing, he says.

There are obvious pieces of strategic infrastructure like communications hubs, gas pipelines and so on. However, other facilities on the list include:

· Cobalt mine in Congo

· Anti-snake venom factory in Australia

· Insulin plant in Denmark

In Britain, the list ranges from Cornwall to Scotland, including key satellite communications sites and the places where trans-Atlantic cables make landfall.

A number of BAE Systems plants involved in joint weapons programmes with the Americans are listed, along with a marine engineering firm in Edinburgh which is said to be “critical” for nuclear powered submarines.

In other cables released by Wikileaks on Sunday:

· Australian Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd, while prime minister, allegedly said at a lunch with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that the West should be prepared to use force against China “if everything goes wrong”

· Qatar is allegedly using the al-Jazeera news network as a bargaining chip, apparently promising Egypt that it would cease the network’s transmission there for a year if President Hosni Mubarak agreed to deliver “a lasting settlement for the Palestinians”

· Mrs Clinton criticised efforts by Saudi Arabia, Qatar, UAE and Kuwait to combat militants, and said that Saudi donors were the “most significant source of funding to Sunni terrorist groups worldwide”

· The alleged mastermind of the 2008 Mumbai attacks, Zaki-ur-Rehman Lakhvi, continued to run militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba, along with the group’s founder, Hafiz Saeed, despite being detained over the attacks

‘Targets for terror’

The geographical range of the document on installations is extraordinary, our correspondent says.

If the US sees itself as waging a “global war on terror” then this represents a global directory of the key installations and facilities – many of them medical or industrial – that are seen as being of vital importance to Washington.

Some locations are given unique billing. The Nadym gas pipeline junction in western Siberia, for example, is described as “the most critical gas facility in the world”.

It is a crucial transit point for Russian gas heading for western Europe.

In some cases, specific pharmaceutical plants or those making blood products are highlighted for their crucial importance to the global supply chain.

The critical question is whether this really is a listing of potential targets that might be of use to a terrorist, our correspondent says.

The cable contains a simple listing. In many cases towns are noted as the location but not actual street addresses, although this is unlikely to stop anyone with access to the internet from locating them.

There are also no details of security measures at any of the listed sites.

What the list might do is to prompt potential attackers to look at a broader range of targets, especially given that the US authorities classify them as being so important.

It is not perhaps a major security breach, but many governments may see it as an unhelpful development, our correspondent says.

It inevitably prompts the question as to exactly what positive benefit Wikileaks was intending in releasing this document, he adds.

Former UK Foreign Secretary Sir Malcolm Rifkind condemned the move.

“This is further evidence that they have been generally irresponsible, bordering on criminal,” Sir Malcolm said. “This is the kind of information terrorists are interested in knowing.”

But Wikileaks lawyer Mark Stevens denied that Wikileaks was putting people and facilities at risk.

“I don’t think there’s anything new in that,” he told the BBC.

“What I think is new is the fact that it’s been published by Wikileaks and of course we have the Wikileaks factor because a number of governments have been embarrassed by what’s happened…”

WikiLeaks: Internet backlash follows US pressure against whistleblowing site

Individuals redirecting parts of their own sites to Swedish internet host amid ‘censorship’

December 5, 2010

by Charles Arthur

Guardian/UK

American pressure to dissuade companies in the US from supporting the WikiLeaks website has led to an online backlash in which individuals are redirecting parts of their own sites to its Swedish internet host.

Since early on Friday morning, it has been impossible to reach WikiLeaks by typing wikileaks.org into a web browser because everyDNS, which would redirect queries for the string “wikileaks.org” to that machine address, removed its support for Wikileaks, claiming that it had broken its terms of service by being the target of a huge hacker attack. (See What is DNS?)

Without a DNS record, it is only possible to reach WikiLeaks by typing in the string of numbers which, for most web users, is too unmemorable to make it feasible.

That, campaigners say, points to the principal weakness in the internet’s pyramidial DNS setup, where a limited number of site registrars can control whether a site is findable by name or not.

Website hosts are being encouraged to add a “/wikileaks” directory into their sites, redirecting to which redirects to http://88.80.13.160/, run by the Swedish hosting company Bahnhof.

At present, that location redirects users to a Wikleaks page at http://213.251.145.96/, which is run by a French company, but if pressure from the French government pushes Wikileaks off that host, it will still have the Swedish location.

At the same time, scores of sites “mirroring” WikiLeaks have sprung up – by lunchtime today, the list was 74-strong and contained sites that have the same content as WikiLeaks and – crucially – link to the downloads of its leaks of 250,000 US diplomatic cables.

The backlash has also gained its own tag on the microblogging service Twitter, where people who have linked to the main site are using the hashtag #imwikileaks.

The technical details of how to make a site’s subdirectory point directly to the WikiLeaks site are described by Paul Carvill, a British developer, and Jamie McClelland.

“I’ve done this as a simple gesture of my support for WikiLeaks and my opposition to arbitrary censorship of the web by governments and corporations,” Carvill says on his page, while McLelland says that adding his support “seems like a good way for us all to really pitch in and share the risk that the folks at WikiLeaks are taking all by themselves”.

American pressure to dissuade companies in the US from supporting the WikiLeaks website has led to an online backlash in which individuals are redirecting parts of their own sites to its Swedish internet host.

Since early on Friday morning, it has been impossible to reach WikiLeaks by typing wikileaks.org into a web browser because everyDNS, which would redirect queries for the string “wikileaks.org” to that machine address, removed its support for Wikileaks, claiming that it had broken its terms of service by being the target of a huge hacker attack. (See What is DNS?)

Without a DNS record, it is only possible to reach WikiLeaks by typing in the string of numbers which, for most web users, is too unmemorable to make it feasible.

That, campaigners say, points to the principal weakness in the internet’s pyramidial DNS setup, where a limited number of site registrars can control whether a site is findable by name or not.

Website hosts are being encouraged to add a “/wikileaks” directory into their sites, redirecting to which redirects to http://88.80.13.160/, run by the Swedish hosting company Bahnhof.

At present, that location redirects users to a Wikleaks page at http://213.251.145.96/, which is run by a French company, but if pressure from the French government pushes Wikileaks off that host, it will still have the Swedish location.

At the same time, scores of sites “mirroring” WikiLeaks have sprung up – by lunchtime today, the list was 74-strong and contained sites that have the same content as WikiLeaks and – crucially – link to the downloads of its leaks of 250,000 US diplomatic cables.

The backlash has also gained its own tag on the microblogging service Twitter, where people who have linked to the main site are using the hashtag #imwikileaks.

The technical details of how to make a site’s subdirectory point directly to the WikiLeaks site are described by Paul Carvill, a British developer, and Jamie McClelland.

“I’ve done this as a simple gesture of my support for WikiLeaks and my opposition to arbitrary censorship of the web by governments and corporations,” Carvill says on his page, while McLelland says that adding his support “seems like a good way for us all to really pitch in and share the risk that the folks at WikiLeaks are taking all by themselves”.

Conversations with the Crow

When the CIA discovered that their former Deputy Director of Clandestine Affairs, Robert T. Crowley, had been talking with author Gregory Douglas, they became fearful (because of what Crowley knew) and outraged (because they knew Douglas would publish eventually) and made many efforts to silence Crowley, mostly by having dozens of FBI agents call or visit him at his Washington home and try to convince him to stop talking to Douglas, whom they considered to be an evil, loose cannon.

Crowley did not listen to them (no one else ever does, either) and Douglas made through shorthand notes of each and every one of their many conversation. TBR News published most of these (some of the really vile ones were left out of the book but will be included on this site as a later addendum ) and the entire collection was later produced as an Ebook.

Now, we reliably learn, various Washington alphabet agencies are trying to find a way to block the circulation of this highly negative, entertaining and dangerous work, so to show our solidarity with our beloved leaders and protectors, and our sincere appreciation for their corrupt and coercive actions, we are going to reprint the entire work, chapter by chapter. (The complete book can be obtained by going to:

http://www.shop.conversationswiththecrow.com/Conversations-with-the-Crow-CWC-GD01.htm🙂

Here is the forty-ninth chapter

Conversation No. 49

Date: Thursday, November 28, 1996

Commenced: 8:45 AM CST

Concluded: 9:22 AM CST

RTC: How are you today, Gregory?

GD: Been up since six working on the next Mueller book. Working on the concentration camp business.

RTC: A sensitive and profitable subject. For the same people. My God, what a money-maker that one is!

GD: Tell me about it. An established writer like Irving could never approach it. If he did, the Jews would go for his throat. Or his back more like it. Did you have many dealings with them?

RTC: As individuals or as professional agents?

GD: Either.

RTC: I have to tell you, Gregory, that I do not like Jews very much and I do not trust any of them. I know a few as individuals and some as agents. Jim loved them and spent half his time sucking up to the Mossad creeps. It bothered me because they were using him, but Jim loved flattery and ate it up. I don’t and I’m an Irish Catholic boy from Chicago. Jim was part Mexican and maybe that was part of it. Anyway, with Jews, it’s take, take and never give. You can’t trust any of them to the corner for a pound of soft soap.

GD: I don’t get involved but I have had bad experiences with them. Always watch your back around them has been my experience.

RTC: I have a report for you made for the UN in ’48 listing all their crimes against the Palestinian. The abused child becomes the abusing parent. My God, those filthy Polacks did terrible, vicious things to the Arabs. Murdered them, poisoned their farm wells, killed their animals and finally slaughtered whole villages of them, women and children. The Jews claim they own the Holy Land but these are Polack Jews and had nothing to do with Palestine. The Russian Jews are the same breed and Stalin, who really hated Jews, used them to butcher Russian Christians whom they hated. And then Josef planned to kill off all the Jews in Moscow.

GD: What about that?

RTC: Round them all up, put them in boxcars and ship them off to Siberia in mid-winter. He planned to slaughter all of them. And after all the filthy work they did for him, too! An ungrateful but realistic man.

GD: Why was this turn-about? He loved Jews, didn’t he?

RTC: No, he did not. Josef was far-sighted and knew, and said, that Jews had no loyalty to anyone except themselves. They hate all other people and feel that anything they do to them is justified. They claim centuries of persecution as their excuse.

GD: Yes, isn’t it odd that over thousands of years, everyone has persecuted the poor Jews. One wonders why.

RTC: Why? They burrow into the machinery of the state and the banking system and eventually take it over. And then, always, the locals get after them and either set them on fire or drive them out of their area or country. This has been going on for many centuries. One could say that the Jews of the world have been very unlucky or people know what they’re doing when they pile up wood for the burning pyres or set up camps.

GD: The stories about gassed millions is hysterically funny. Puts me in mind of the stories about the Easter Bunny or the Second Coming. Useful lies for children on one hand and a means to get money out of the suckers who actually believe the silliness about the Rapture, the Battle of Armageddon and other idiotic legends. Barnum was right.

RTC: Yes, he was. And I once looked into the camp story just because I could. There is much on this issue at the National Archives but most people can’t see it.

GD: Why not?

RTC: The Jews don’t want you see this. It would destroy the myth of vast gas chambers and soap factories. My God, Gregory, the Jews make vast sums of money off these made-up stories. I can just hear some raddled Jewess moaning in a furniture store about how her whole family was gassed and can she get 50% off on that chair? Oh yes, I know all about such creatures. And now, the Mossad wants us to hunt down people they don’t like, or send them confidential files on people they want to blackmail. They robbed and murdered the Arabs, so they have to hate them to justify their filthy behavior. The Arabs outnumber them 20 to 1 but the Israelis have us behind them so they literally can get away with murder. And how do they have our support? By working their way into the system, by owning most of the media, by bribery and blackmail, by political pressure. I could go on for days but I just ate breakfast and I don’t want to vomit onto my lap.

GD: I knew the Polish Jews in Munich after the war. Jesus H. Christ, Robert, I have never seen such really terrible people in my life. They were all up on the Muehl Strasse and going there to buy cheap butter for my friends was quite an experience. It was like tiptoeing into a den of circling hyenas. I was always neutral as far as Jews were concerned, but my experiences there radically altered my views. They were DPs. Displaced Persons. Couldn’t go back to Poland where the locals would have shoved them into barns and set them on fire. The Germans got blamed for much of that, but it was the local Poles who snuffed all the Jews in the neighborhood once their central government fell apart in ’39. A friend of mine was a Major in the thirty seventh infantry and he said the Poles would round up all the Jews and barbecue them. Said some of the villages smelt like a badly-vented crematorium. And of course they got the blame for it. Well, they lost so they can expect this. I once bought a German steel helmet at a flea market in Germany and I was carrying it down the street under my arm and some old hag came up behind me, screeching like a wet pea hen. There was no one around so I bashed her on the head with the pot until she shut up. Had to wash the helmet off later. It looked like pink oatmeal on part of it.

RTC: Bravo. I suppose she was dead, Gregory?

GD: I didn’t stop to examine her but she had certainly shut up.

RTC: I suppose she was a Jew.

GD: I didn’t care who she was. She could have been anyone and I would have shut her up regardless.

RTC: You are certainly not a nice person at times.

GD: Oh, I love that, Robert. If I were in your house for dinner, I assure you my manners would be impeccable. But we digress. Can we find out more about that business you people had with the French getting us into Vietnam?

RTC: I wrote on that, Gregory. I ought to send you my manuscript some day. I can’t publish it because I signed a pledge to never publish without permission and I am sure it would never be given. I know all about that slaughterhouse, believe me. A nation steeped in blood. Terrible business. Wars for nothing and when Kennedy tried to get out, that was one of the reasons he got killed. Too much money to be made in a war. It ruined Johnson. No chance of getting reelected. McNamara thought he could apply business norms to a military business and he went as well. Probably be made the head of a think tank. My God, what a misnomer. ‘Think tank’ my ass. Bunch of loud-mouthed idiots running around babbling as if anyone cared what they thought about unimportant things. “I think…” is one of the worst openings for any kind of a conversation. Run into these congenital assholes at any Beltway social function and especially in the CIA circles. I say, who gives a damn what you think?

GD: I’ve been to Beltway functions, Robert. My God, if we could somehow trap all the hot air these methane monsters create, we could heat New York for ten years. Don’t light any matches and breathe very shortly but the gas is tremendous. “I think…?” I doubt it. Most of these self-important cow anuses should join hands and jump off the Key Bridge in the middle of winter. Right through the ice and then blessed silence. Downriver, however, all the marine life dies a terrible death.

RTC: (Laughter) Ah, well, it won’t happen. One day a Jew will sit in the Oval Office and on that day, we will drop atom bombs on anyone Tel Aviv doesn’t like.

GD: Where is Genghis Kahn now that we need him?

RTC: Lee Harvey Oswald would be more to the point.

(Concluded at 9:22 Am CST)

Dramatis personae:

James Jesus Angleton: Once head of the CIA’s Counterintelligence division, later fired because of his obsessive and illegal behavior, tapping the phones of many important government officials in search of elusive Soviet spies. A good friend of Robert Crowley and a co-conspirator with him in the assassination of President Kennedy

James P. Atwood: (April 16, 1930-April 20, 1997) A CIA employee, located in Berlin, Atwood had a most interesting career. He worked for any other intelligence agency, domestic or foreign, that would pay him, was involved in selling surplus Russian atomic artillery shells to the Pakistan government and was also most successful in the manufacturing of counterfeit German dress daggers. Too talkative, Atwood eventually had a sudden, and fatal, “seizure” while lunching with CIA associates.

William Corson: A Marine Corps Colonel and President Carter’s representative to the CIA. A friend of Crowley and Kimmel, Corson was an intelligent man whose main failing was a frantic desire to be seen as an important person. This led to his making fictional or highly exaggerated claims.

John Costello: A British historian who was popular with revisionist circles. Died of AIDS on a trans-Atlantic flight to the United States.

James Critchfield: Former U.S. Army Colonel who worked for the CIA and organizaed the Cehlen Org. at Pullach, Germany. This organization was filled to the Plimsoll line with former Gestapo and SD personnel, many of whom were wanted for various purported crimes. He hired Heinrich Müller in 1948 and went on to represent the CIA in the Persian Gulf.

Robert T. Crowley: Once the deputy director of Clandestine Operations and head of the group that interacted with corporate America. A former West Point football player who was one of the founders of the original CIA. Crowley was involved at a very high level with many of the machinations of the CIA.

Gregory Douglas: A retired newspaperman, onetime friend of Heinrich Müller and latterly, of Robert Crowley. Inherited stacks of files from the former (along with many interesting works of art acquired during the war and even more papers from Robert Crowley.) Lives comfortably in a nice house overlooking the Mediterranean.

Reinhard Gehlen: A retired German general who had once been in charge of the intelligence for the German high command on Russian military activities. Fired by Hitler for incompetence, he was therefore naturally hired by first, the U.S. Army and then, as his level of incompetence rose, with the CIA. His Nazi-stuffed organizaion eventually became the current German Bundes Nachrichten Dienst.

Thomas K. Kimmel, Jr: A grandson of Admiral Husband Kimmel, Naval commander at Pearl Harbor who was scapegoated after the Japanese attack. Kimmel was a senior FBI official who knew both Gregory Douglas and Robert Crowley and made a number of attempts to discourage Crowley from talking with Douglas. He was singularly unsuccessful. Kimmel subsequently retired and lives in retirement in Florida

Willi Krichbaum: A Senior Colonel (Oberführer) in the SS, head of the wartime Secret Field Police of the German Army and Heinrich Müller’s standing deputy in the Gestapo. After the war, Krichbaum went to work for the Critchfield organization and was their chief recruiter and hired many of his former SS friends. Krichbaum put Critchfield in touch with Müller in 1948.

Heinrich Müller: A former military pilot in the Bavarian Army in WWI, Müller became a political police officer in Munich and was later made the head of the Secret State Police or Gestapo. After the war, Müller escaped to Switzerland where he worked for Swiss intelligence as a specialist on Communist espionage and was hired by James Critchfield, head of the Gehlen Organization, in 1948. Müller subsequently was moved to Washington where he worked for the CIA until he retired.

Joseph Trento: A writer on intelligence subjects, Trento and his wife “assisted” both Crowley and Corson in writing a book on the Russian KGB. Trento believed that he would inherit all of Crowley’s extensive files but after Crowley’s death, he discovered that the files had been gutted and the most important, and sensitive, ones given to Gregory Douglas. Trento was not happy about this. Neither were his employers.

Frank Wisner: A Founding Father of the CIA who promised much to the Hungarian and then failed them. First, a raging lunatic who was removed from Langley, screaming, in a strait jacket and later, blowing off the top of his head with a shotgun.

Robert Wolfe: A retired librarian from the National Archives who worked closely with the CIA on covering up embarrassing historical material in the files of the Archives. A strong supporter of holocaust writers

Register of the Dead in the Bush/Obama war 13

http://www.defense.gov/Releases

December 1, 2010

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

1st. Lt. Scott F. Milley, 23, of Sudbury, Mass., died Nov. 30 in Logar province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using small arms fire.  He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 30th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Polk, La.

The Department of Defense announced today the death of an airman who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

Lt. Col. Gwendolyn A. Locht, 46, of Fort Walton Beach, Fla., was medically evacuated from Kandahar, Afghanistan, on May 22 for treatment of a non-combat related illness.  She died Nov. 16 in Houston, Texas.  Locht was assigned to the 96th Inpatient Operations Squadron, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

The Department of Defense announced today the deaths of six soldiers who were supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.  They died Nov. 29, in Nangarhar province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when an insurgent attacked their unit with small arms fire.

Killed were:

Sgt. 1st Class Barry E. Jarvis, 36, of Tell City, Ind.

Staff Sgt. Curtis A. Oakes, 29, of Athens, Ohio.

Spc. Matthew W. Ramsey, 20, of Quartz Hill, Calif.

Pfc. Jacob A. Gassen, 21, of Beaver Dam, Wis.

Pfc. Austin G. Staggs, 19, of Senoia, Ga.

Pvt. Buddy W. McLain, 24, of Mexico, Maine.

They were assigned to the 1st Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Ky.

December 2, 2010

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a Marine who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

Cpl. Chad S. Wade, 22, of Bentonville, Ark., died Dec. 1 while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan.  He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Pendleton, Calif.

December 4, 2010

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a Marine who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

Sgt. Matthew T. Abbate, 26, of Honolulu, Hawaii, died Dec. 2 while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan.  He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Pendleton, Calif.

December 4, 2010

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

Sgt. 1st Class James E. Thode, 45, of Kirtland, N.M., died Dec. 2 at Sabari District, Khowst Province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using an improvised explosive device.  He was assigned to the 1457th Engineer Battalion, 204th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade, Salt Lake City, Utah.

December 6, 2010-

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a Marine who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

Lance Cpl. Lucas C. Scott, 20, of Peebles, Ohio, died Dec. 3 while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan.  He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

December 7, 2010

The Department of Defense announced today the death of a soldier who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

Staff Sgt. Jason A. Reeves, 32, of Odessa, Texas, died December 5 at Gardez District, Paktia Province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using an improvised explosive device.  He was assigned to the 2nd Military Intelligence Battalion, 66th Military Intelligence Brigade, Hohenfels, Germany.

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