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TBR News March 20, 2020

Mar 20 2020

The Voice of the White House
Washington, D.C. March 120 2020:“Working in the White House as a junior staffer is an interesting experience.
When I was younger, I worked as a summer-time job in a clinic for people who had moderate to severe mental problems and the current work closely, at times, echos the earlier one.
I am not an intimate of the President but I have encountered him from time to time and I daily see manifestations of his growing psychological problems.
He insults people, uses foul language, is frantic to see his name mentioned on main-line television and pays absolutely no attention to any advice from his staff that runs counter to his strange ideas.
He lies like a rug to everyone, eats like a hog, makes lewd remarks to female staffers and flies into rages if anyone dares to contradict him.
It is becoming more and more evident to even the least intelligent American voter that Trump is vicious, corrupt and amoral. He has stated often that even if he loses the
election in 2020, he will not leave the White House. I have news for Donald but this is not the place to discuss it.

Commentary for March 20, 2020
Hysterical myths versus reality
Coronavirus originated in China.
Chinese peasants live with hogs in their back yard, chickens in the kitchen and on and on.
A flu based on some animal disease is very common in China.
The current flu, Coronavirus, is a lightweight flu, very contagious and of short duration.
My informant in the FBI told me that the Chinese were pissed off at Trump for messing with their economy; issuing bombastic threats one day, being pleasant the next.
They took a common virus, no more deadly than the common cold, and used it as an excuse to shut down factories that were supplying America retail business with parts.
This was to send a warning to Trump to back off.
But someone got their hands on the virus and blew it up out of all proportion to reality and has been creating social havoc world-wide.
Yes, people die of Coronavirus. But last year, 55,000 (!) Americans died of the standard flu and there was no mass hysteria such as the lunacy we see today.
Now Coronavirus could mutate very dangerous but to date has not done so.
Either the global media is packed to the Plimsoll line with drooling idiots or there is a general plan to create economic and social havoc in their readers.
Perhaps this is a methodology to increase circulation in a media that is shrinking slowly into economic oblivion.
If so, when the general public discovers they have been tricked, there will be serious trouble.
Elections are coming up and an enraged voting majority has a strong influence with Congress.
Recall, sir, that he who touches pitch shall be defiled.
John Hopkins has published an excellent study of the relatively harmlessness of Coronavirus and Google is beginning to publish more such articles.
A friend who holds a position of importance at Google (in Mountain View, California) has told me, under strict confidence, that his firm has been told to minimize articles that downplay the purported deadliness of the Chinese virus and to bury articles that run counter to the hype thrust.

More scare propganda from Reuters

• California issues ‘stay home’ order as U.S. deaths hit 200
• World’s top debt funds lose billions
• U.S. power industry may ask key employees to live at work if coronavirus worsens
• Come back to fight coronavirus, UK begs 65,000 former nurses and doctors
• Global economy already in recession on coronavirus devastation: Reuters poll
• Coronavirus deaths in Italy overtake China as economic damage mounts
• YouTube to reduce streaming quality in Europe due to coronavirus
• Nissan’s UK factory closed until further notice over coronavirus
• France sends warship to evacuate coronavirus patients from Corsica
• Coronavirus takes brutal toll on small U.S. eateries

and from The Guardian
• Death toll in Spain reaches 1,000 as Germany threatens further curfews
• EU ‘open’ to Brexit delay request from UK – Von Der Leyen
• Mixed day for global stock markets
• UK train services to be reduced
• UK’s key workers allowed to keep children in school
• World’s most vulnerable in ‘third wave’ for Covid-19 support, warn experts
• Fears that lack of coronavirus testing and supplies could mean refugees and those caught in crises are left behind
• Coronavirus credit crunch could make 2008 look like ‘child’s play’
• Southern Italy braces for ‘tsunami’ of coronavirus cases
• ‘We were on borrowed time’: coronavirus could strike final blow to local newspapers
• A number of west coast papers have suspended publication as ad revenue from local events and businesses plummets

and from the New York Times
• Hospitals Struggle to Prepare for Surge of Coronavirus Patients
• As Global Toll Passes 10,000, Medical Workers Brace for Worst
• On both sides of the Atlantic, policymakers sought an effective response to both a public health disaster and a growing economic crisis.
• Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered all Californians to stay in except for essential trips. Many businesses will be closed.
• Officials in Australia are tracking down thousands of passengers who left a Princess Cruise ship.
• All 40 Million Californians Ordered to Stay In
• New York Has Over 40 Percent of U.S. Coronavirus Cases
• A huge increase in testing capacity in the state and the quickening spread of the virus have yielded sobering news.
• Search for Vaccine Becomes a Global Competition

and the Washington Post
• ‘We’re about to be overwhelmed,’ L.A. Mayor Garcetti says
• New York to close hair salons and tattoo parlors, mandates 75 percent reduction of all nonessential in-person workforces
• More Americans approve of Trump’s handling of the crisis, poll finds
• Death toll in Spain surges by 30 percent in one day
• The coronavirus has thrown us all in the mud
• The week the coronavirus ground the sports world to a halt
• Italian doctor dies of coronavirus after reportedly having to treat patients without gloves
• The danger of a second wave
• Mapping the virus’s spread
• What if I think I’m infected?
• We could all soon be in California’s situation

and, finally, from Deutsche Welle
• Coronavirus latest: Bavaria announces lockdown
• As the global COVID-19 pandemic worsens, businesses across the globe are being forced to dramatically change operations both to stay afloat and to do some wider good for a stricken society.
• Coronavirus and basic rights: What is the German state allowed to do?
• Hands off! What can we touch during the coronavirus outbreak?
• What does the coronavirus do when it infects someone?
• Coronavirus: Germany plans to mobilize military reservists
• Coronavirus compounds problems for German carmakers
• Coronavirus: Fears of domestic violence, child abuse rise
• Coronavirus latest: Italy deaths surge past China
• Will the coronavirus change the way we work from home?

How about …..

• All paper money to be confiscated and burned by DHS
• How locking up your mother-in-law in the closet can save lives
• Millions die in Outer Mongolia
• All US motels to burn bed sheets after guests leave
• Germ laden Tablets to be seized by FBI
• Montenegro death toll at seventeen, European health authorities horrified
• All infected witches to be burnt at stake in England
• Bat urine coronavirus tester to be produced in Florida
• Sulfuric acid skin tests tried in Austin
• Picture of Jesus cures hundreds of deadly virus victims in Chicago

The Table of Contents
• Coronavirus Death Rate in Wuhan Is Lower than Previously Thought, Study Finds
• The Coronavirus Crisis
• Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE)
• Coronavirus Death Rate in Wuhan Is Lower than Previously Thought, Study Finds
• The Coronavirus Crisis

Coronavirus Death Rate in Wuhan Is Lower than Previously Thought, Study Finds
Researchers calculated a 1.4 percent likelihood of dying in the city where the pandemic began. Earlier estimates ranged from 2 percent to 3.4 percent.
March 19, 2020
by Pam Belluck
New York Times
A new study reports that people who became sick from the coronavirus in the Chinese city where the outbreak began likely had a lower death rate than previously thought.
The study, published Thursday in the journal Nature Medicine, calculated that people with coronavirus symptoms in Wuhan, China, had a 1.4 percent likelihood of dying. Some previous estimates have ranged from 2 percent to 3.4 percent.
Assessing the risk of death in Wuhan is instructive because it provides a snapshot of the epidemic from the beginning, when doctors were scrambling to treat people with the brand-new virus and hospitals were overwhelmed. Some experts say that such a benchmark — known as the symptomatic case fatality rate — could be lower in countries like the United States if measures like widespread business and school closures and appeals for social distancing have the desired effect of slowing the spread of the disease.
“The experience gained from managing those initial patients and the increasing availability of newer, and potentially better, treatment modalities to more patients would presumably lead to fewer deaths, all else being equal,” wrote the study authors, a team that included scientists from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
But a 1.4 percent case fatality rate still means many deaths. By comparison, the average seasonal flu kills about 0.1 percent of the people it infects in the United States.
The new study calculated estimates based on cases in Wuhan as of Feb. 29, when there had been 48,557 confirmed patients and 2,169 deaths. The risk of death increased with age, “unlike any previously reported pandemic or seasonal influenza,” the researchers wrote.
While the overall symptomatic case fatality rate was 1.4 percent, for people who were 60 and older it was 2.6 percent. That makes the older age group about five times more likely to die than people with symptoms who were 30 to 59 years old, whose risk of dying was 0.5 percent. For those under 30, it was 0.3 percent.
The risk of developing symptomatic infection itself also increased with age, about 4 percent per year for people aged 30 to 60, the study said. The authors estimated that people 60 and older were twice as likely to develop symptoms as people aged 30 to 59 and that people under 30 have about one-sixth the chance of developing symptoms from the infection. That suggests, as has other research, that many young people may be unknowingly infected and able to spread the virus to others.
The researchers noted that their estimates faced some limitations, including that the study would not reflect the many people who were not tested and diagnosed, and that the data might not adequately capture people who were infected in Wuhan and traveled elsewhere. And although their estimated risk of death is lower than previous guesses, the authors make it clear that the virus will undoubtedly leave many casualties in its wake.
The findings “indicate that Covid-19 transmission is difficult to control,” they wrote, adding that “we might expect at least half of the population to be infected, even with aggressive use of community mitigation measures.”

The Coronavirus Crisis
Fake Facts Are Flying About Coronavirus. Now There’s A Plan To Debunk Them
by Malaka Gharib
NPR
The coronavirus outbreak has sparked what the World Health Organization is calling an “infodemic” — an overwhelming amount of information on social media and websites. Some of it’s accurate. And some is downright untrue.
The false statements range from a conspiracy theory that the virus is a man-made bioweapon to the claim that more than 100,000 have died from the disease (as of this week, there are more than 3800 reported fatalities world wide).
WHO is fighting back. In early January, a few weeks after China reported the first cases, the U.N. agency launched a pilot program to make sure the facts about the newly identified virus are communicated to the public. The project is called EPI-WIN — short for WHO Information Network for Epidemics.
“We need a vaccine against misinformation,” said Dr. Mike Ryan, head of WHO’s health emergencies program, at a WHO briefing on the virus in February.
While this is not the first health crisis that has been characterized by online misinformation — it happened with Ebola, for example — researchers are especially concerned because this outbreak is centered in China. The world’s most populous country has the largest market of Internet users globally: 21% of the world’s 3.8 billion Internet users are in China.
And fake news can spread quickly online. A 2018 study from Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that “false news spreads more rapidly on the social network Twitter than real news does.” The reason, say the researchers, may be that the untrue statements inspire strong feelings such as fear, disgust and surprise.
This dynamic could cause fake coronavirus cures and treatments to fan out widely on social media — and as a result, worsen the impact of the outbreak, says Bhaskar Chakravorti, dean of global business at the Fletcher School at Tufts University. Over the past decade, he has been tracking the effect of digital technology on issues such as global health and economic development.
The rumors offer remedies that have no basis in science. One untrue statement suggests that rubbing sesame oil on the skin will block the coronavirus.
If segments of the public turn to false treatments rather than follow the advice of trusted sources for avoiding illness (like frequent hand-washing with soap and water), it could cause “the disease to travel further and faster than it ordinarily would have,” says Chakravorti.
There could be a political agenda behind the fake coronavirus news as well. Countries that are antagonistic toward China could try to hijack the conversation in hopes of creating chaos and eroding trust in the authorities, says Dr. Margaret Bourdeaux, research director for Harvard Belfer Center’s Security and Global Health Project.
“Disinformation that specifically targets your health system or your leaders who are trying to manage an emergency is a way of destroying, undermining, disrupting your health system,” she says.
In the instance of vaccines, Russian bots have been identified as fueling skepticism about the effectiveness of vaccination for childhood diseases in the U.S.
The World Health Organization’s EPI-WIN team believes that the countermeasure for misinformation and disinformation is simply to tell the truth.
It works rapidly to debunk unjustified medical claims on social media. In a series of bright blue graphics posted on Instagram, EPI-WIN states categorically that neither sesame oil nor breathing in the smoke of fire or fireworks will kill the new coronavirus.
Part of this truth-telling strategy involves enlisting large-scale employers.
The approach, says Melinda Frost, an officer on the EPI-WIN team, is based on the idea that employers are the most trusted institution in society, a finding reflected in a 2020 study on global trust from the public relations firm Edelman: “People tend to trust their employers more than they trust several other sources of information.”
Over the past several weeks, Frost and her team have been organizing rounds of conference calls with representatives from Fortune 500 companies and other multinational corporations in sectors such as health, travel and tourism, food and agriculture, and business.
The company representatives share questions that their employees might have about the coronavirus outbreak — for example, is it safe to go to conferences? The EPI-WIN team gathers the frequently asked questions, has their experts answer them within a few days, and then sends the responses back to the companies to distribute in internal newsletters and other communication.
Because the information is coming from their employer, says Frost, the hope is that people will be more likely to believe what they hear and pass the information on to their family and community.
Bourdeaux at Harvard calls this approach a “smart move.”
It borrows from “advertising techniques from the 1950s,” she adds. “They’re establishing the narrative before anybody else can. They are going on offense, saying, ‘Here are the facts.’ ”
WHO is also collaborating with tech giants like Google, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and TikTok to limit the spread of harmful rumors. It’s pursuing a similar tactic with Chinese digital companies such as Baidu, Tencent and Weibo.
“We are asking them to filter out false information and promote accurate information from credible sources like WHO, CDC [the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] and others. And we thank them for their efforts so far,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of WHO, in a briefing earlier this month.
Twitter, for example, now actively bumps up credible sources such as WHO and the CDC in search results for the term “coronavirus.”
“We’re also taking proactive action on any coordinated attempts to undermine the public conversation on this critical issue,” wrote a Twitter spokesperson in a statement to NPR.
Facebook (which is one of NPR’s financial sponsors) is implementing similar strategies. “When people search for information related to the virus on Facebook, we will surface an educational pop-up with credible information in multiple languages and countries,” wrote a Facebook spokesperson in a statement to NPR. “We’ve connected people to regional health ministries in several countries, for example: The Center for Health Protection in Hong Kong, Taiwan Center for Disease Control in Taiwan, the Republic of the Philippines Department of Health in the Philippines, the Ministry of Health in Italy.”
Facebook has taken the extra step of deploying fact-checkers to remove content with false claims or conspiracy theories about the outbreak. Kang-Xing Jin, head of health at Facebook, wrote in a statement about one such rumor that it has eliminated from its platform: that drinking bleach cures coronavirus.
Chakravorti applauds WHO’s coordination with the digital companies — but says he’s particularly impressed with Facebook’s efforts. “This is a radical departure from Facebook’s past record, including its controversial insistence on permitting false political ads,” he wrote in an op-ed in Bloomberg News.
Still, there is no silver bullet to fighting health misinformation. It has become “very, very difficult to fight effectively,” says Chakravorti of Tufts University.
A post making a false claim about coronavirus can just “jump platforms,” he says. “So you might have Facebook taking down a post, but then the post finds its way on Twitter, then it jumps from Twitter to YouTube.”
In addition to efforts by WHO and other organizations, individuals are doing their part.
On Wednesday, The Lancet published a statement from 27 public health scientists addressing rumors that the coronavirus had been engineered in a Wuhan lab: “We stand together to strongly condemn conspiracy theories suggesting that COVID-19 does not have a natural origin …. Conspiracy theories do nothing but create fear, rumors and prejudice that jeopardize our global collaboration in the fight against this virus.”
Dr. Deliang Tang, a molecular epidemiologist at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, says his friends from medical school and his research colleagues in China find it difficult to trust Chinese health authorities, especially after police reprimanded the eight Chinese doctors who warned others about a pneumonia-like disease in December.
As a result, Tang’s network in China has been looking to him and others in the scientific community to share information.
Since the outbreak began, Tang says he has been answering “30 to 50 questions a night.” Many want to fact-check rumors or learn about clinical trials for a potential cure.
“My real work starts at 7 p.m.,” he says — morning in China.

Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE)
Johns Hopkins University (JHU)
March 12, 2020

Data sources: WHO, CDC, ECDC, NHC and DXY and local media reports.
https://www.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6
Visit the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center where our experts help to advance understanding of the virus, inform the public, and brief policymakers in order to guide a response, improve care, and save lives.
Note: All cases of COVID-19 in repatriated US citizens from the Diamond Princess are grouped together, and their location is currently designated at the ship’s port location off the coast of Japan. These individuals have been assigned to various quarantine locations (in military bases and hospitals) around the US. This grouping is consistent with the CDC.

Total Confirmed Cases of Corona Virus as of March 12, 2020
127,863

Total Deaths
4,718

Total Recovered
68,310
Confirmed Cases by Country/Region/Sovereignty
80,932 China
12,462 Italy
10,075 Iran
7,869 Korea, South
2,284 France
2,277 Spain
2,078 Germany
1,323 US
702 Norway
696 Cruise Ship
652 Switzerland
639 Japan
617 Denmark
503 Netherlands
500 Sweden
459 United Kingdom
314 Belgium
302 Austria
262 Qatar
195 Bahrain
178 Singapore
149 Malaysia
130 Israel
128 Australia
117 Canada
99 Greece
94 Czechia
89 Slovenia
85 Iceland
80 Kuwait
74 United Arab Emirates
73 India
71 Iraq
70 Thailand
69 San Marino
67 Egypt
61 Lebanon
59 Finland
59 Portugal
52 Brazil
52 Philippines
49 Romania
49 Taiwan*
49 Poland
45 Saudi Arabia
43 Ireland
39 Vietnam
34 Indonesia
28 Russia
24 Algeria
24 Georgia
23 Chile
22 Costa Rica
20 Pakistan
19 Argentina
19 Luxembourg
19 Croatia
19 Serbia
18 Oman
17 South Africa
17 Ecuador
16 Slovakia
16 Estonia
15 Albania
15 Peru
13 Hungary
12 Belarus
12 Mexico
11 Bosnia and Herzegovina
11 Azerbaijan
11 Panama
11 Brunei
10 Latvia
9 Colombia
8 Maldives
7 North Macedonia
7 Afghanistan
7 Bulgaria
7 Tunisia
6 Morocco
6 Cyprus
6 Malta
5 French Guiana
5 New Zealand
5 Dominican Republic
5 Paraguay
4 Senegal
3 Lithuania
3 Cambodia
3 Bangladesh
3 Cuba
3 Moldova
3 Martinique
2 Bolivia
2 Cameroon
2 Burkina Faso
2 Jamaica
2 Monaco
2 Nigeria
2 Honduras
2 Sri Lanka
1 Turkey
1 Mongolia
1 Togo
1 Armenia
1 Ukraine
1 Liechtenstein
1 Andorra
1 Reunion
1 Bhutan
1 Nepal
1 Congo (Kinshasa)
1 Holy See
1 Cote d’Ivoire
1 Jordan
1 Guyana

Recovered cases as of Mrch 12, 2020
80,932 China
12,462 Italy
10,075 Iran
7,869 Korea, South
2,284 France
2,277 Spain
2,078 Germany
1,323 US
702 Norway
696 Cruise Ship
652 Switzerland
639 Japan
617 Denmark
503 Netherlands
500 Sweden
459 United Kingdom
314 Belgium
302 Austria
262 Qatar
195 Bahrain
178 Singapore
149 Malaysia
130 Israel
128 Australia
117 Canada
99 Greece
94 Czechia
89 Slovenia
85 Iceland
80 Kuwait
74 United Arab Emirates
73 India
71 Iraq
70 Thailand
69 San Marino
67 Egypt
61 Lebanon
59 Finland
59 Portugal
52 Brazil
52 Philippines
49 Romania
49 Taiwan*
49 Poland
45 Saudi Arabia
43 Ireland
39 Vietnam
34 Indonesia
28 Russia
24 Algeria
24 Georgia
23 Chile
22 Costa Rica
20 Pakistan
19 Argentina
19 Luxembourg
19 Croatia
19 Serbia
18 Oman
17 South Africa
17 Ecuador
16 Slovakia
16 Estonia
15 Albania
15 Peru
13 Hungary
12 Belarus
12 Mexico
11 Bosnia and Herzegovina
11 Azerbaijan
11 Panama
11 Brunei
10 Latvia
9 Colombia
8 Maldives
7 North Macedonia
7 Afghanistan
7 Bulgaria
7 Tunisia
6 Morocco
6 Cyprus
6 Malta
5 French Guiana
5 New Zealand
5 Dominican Republic
5 Paraguay
4 Senegal
3 Lithuania
3 Cambodia
3 Bangladesh
3 Cuba
3 Moldova
3 Martinique
2 Bolivia
2 Cameroon
2 Burkina Faso
2 Jamaica
2 Monaco
2 Nigeria
2 Honduras
2 Sri Lanka
1 Turkey
1 Mongolia
1 Togo
1 Armenia
1 Ukraine
1 Liechtenstein
1 Andorra
1 Reunion
1 Bhutan
1 Nepal
1 Congo (Kinshasa)
1 Holy See
1 Cote d’Ivoire
1 Jordan
1 Guyana

Recovered from coronavirus infection

50,318 recovered

Hubei China
2,959 recovered
Iran
1,289 recovered
Guangdong China
1,249 recovered
Henan China
1,197 recovered
Zhejiang China
1,045 recovered
Italy
999 recovered
Hunan China
984 recovered
Anhui China
934 recovered
Jiangxi China
734 recovered
Shandong China
629 recovered
Jiangsu China
554 recovered
Chongqing China
498 recovered
Sichuan China
441 recovered
Heilongjiang China
334 recovered
Beijing China
333 recovered
Korea, South
325 recovered
Diamond Princess Cruise Ship
321 recovered
Shanghai China
308 recovered
Hebei China
295 recovered
Fujian China
241 recovered
Guangxi China
232 recovered
Shaanxi China
183 recovered
Spain
170 recovered
Yunnan China
160 recovered
Hainan China
137 recovered
Guizhou China
132 recovered
Shanxi China
132 recovered
Tianjin China
118 recovered
Japan
112 recovered
Liaoning China
96 recovered
Singapore
92 recovered
Jilin China
88 recovered
Gansu China
73 recovered
Xinjiang China
72 recovered
Ningxia China
71 recovered
Inner Mongolia China
67 recovered
Hong Kong China
35 recovered
Bahrain
34 recovered
Thailand
27 recovered
Egypt
26 recovered
Malaysia
25 recovered
Germany
20 recovered
Taiwan*
18 recovered
Qinghai China
18 recovered
UK United Kingdom
17 recovered
United Arab Emirates
16 recovered
Vietnam
15 recovered
Iraq
12 recovered
France France
10 recovered
Macau China
9 recovered
Oman
8 recovered
Algeria
8 recovered
Queensland Australia
7 recovered
Victoria Australia
6 recovered
Romania
5 recovered
Kuwait
4 recovered
New South Wales Australia
4 recovered
Austria
4 recovered
British Columbia Canada
4 recovered
Ontario Canada
4 recovered
India
4 recovered
Israel
4 recovered
Mexico
4 recovered
Switzerland
3 recovered
Azerbaijan
3 recovered
Belarus
3 recovered
Russia
2 recovered
South Australia Australia
2 recovered
Indonesia
2 recovered
Pakistan
2 recovered
Philippines
2 recovered
California US
2 recovered
Illinois US
1 recovered
Belgium
1 recovered
Cambodia
1 recovered
Tibet China
1 recovered
Denmark Denmark
1 recovered
Finland
1 recovered
Iceland
1 recovered
Latvia
1 recovered
Lebanon
1 recovered
Nepal
1 recovered
Norway
1 recovered
Saudi Arabia
1 recovered
Senegal
1 recovered
Sri Lanka
1 recovered
Sweden
1 recovered
Gibraltar United Kingdom
1 recovered
Arizona US
1 recovered
Massachusetts US
1 recovered
Washington US
1 recovered
Wisconsin US

Deaths from corona virus as of March 12, 2020

6 deaths Chongqing China
6 deaths Hainan China
6 deaths Hebei China
6 deaths Shandong China
5 deaths Netherlands
4 deaths Hunan China
4 deaths Switzerland
4 deaths California US
3 deaths Belgium
3 deaths Hong Kong China
3 deaths Shanghai China
3 deaths Sichuan China
3 deaths Tianjin China
3 deaths Xinjiang China
3 deaths Germany
3 deaths Lebanon
3 deaths San Marino
2 deaths New South Wales Australia
2 deaths Gansu China
2 deaths Guangxi China
2 deaths Guizhou China
2 deaths Shaanxi China
2 deaths Yunnan China
2 deaths Philippines
2 deaths Florida US
1 death lbania
1 death Algeria
1 death Argentina
1 death Western Australia Australia
1 death Austria
1 deaths Bulgaria
1 death British Columbia Canada
1 death Fujian China
1 death Inner Mongolia China
1 death Jiangxi China
1 death Jilin China
1 death Liaoning China
1 death Zhejiang China
1 death Egypt
1 death Greece
1 death Guyana
1 death India
1 death Indonesia
1 death Ireland
1 death Morocco
1 death Panama
1 death Poland
1 death Sweden
1 death Taiwan*
1 deathsThailand
1 death New Jersey US
1 death South Dakota US

 

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