Archive for January, 2018

TBR News January 31, 2018

Jan 31 2018 Published by under Uncategorized

The Voice of the White House

Washington, D.C. January 31, 2018:”There recently appeared on what is often called the Dark Internet, a thick file of official reports on various activities of the CIA. This includes mind control experiments, assassination of unwanted political figures, domestic and foreign (the domestic ones include John F. Kennedy) lunatic projects like the Ingo Swann/SRI ‘out of body” programs, drugs designed to cause the user to become disoriented during a speech or at a public event to destroy their reputations, the use of undetectable torture techniques such a waterboarding, spying on top domestic and foreign leaders, infiltrating foreign intelligence and business entities (such as German television companies or banks)urging governmental use of the products of companies in which the CIA leadership held a financial interest, setting up so-called “think tanks” such as the Rand organization in Santa Monica, California, to support their domestic and foreign plans and many more very specific bits of information. The publication of this file, which is, one understands, in progress, will cause spastic colon in Langley (and elsewhere in clever CIA front organizations) and selected persons who know too much will join hands and jump of the Key Bridge over the Potomac and downstream they will be fishing the bloated corpses out of the water like the Chinese were hauling similar corpses of dead pigs out of their river recently.”

Table of Contents

  • Donald Trump Made a Few Promises During the State of the Union. Let’s Add Them to the Pile.
  • Trump State of the Union address promised unity but emphasized discord
  • Joe Kennedy’s State of the Union response:
  • ‘Chemtrail’ conspiracy theorists: The people who think governments control the weather
  • Science Officially Debunks Chemtrails, But the Conspiracy Will Likely Live On
  • Miscalculations in Israel Could Pave Way to Wider War
  • Israel risks ‘perpetual occupation and conflict,’ German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel says
  • An absence of truth
  • Federal judge blocks Kansas law punishing BDS supporters
  • Mass Surveillance and the Memory Hole
  • Germany green lights construction of Russian gas pipeline Nord Stream

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TBR News January 30, 2018

Jan 30 2018 Published by under Uncategorized

The Voice of the White House

Washington, D.C. January 30, 2018: “The French philosopher Blaise Pascal discusses self-important individuals in his essay on ‘Thoughts.’

As I recall the passage, he says that men would be great but know that they are small, would be happy but are miserable, wish to be perfect but know that they are full of imperfections and wish to be honored and loved by others but know that their flaws merit only contempt. I believe the passage goes in that way. And it continues to say that these persons become violently angry against these truths which so clearly expose their faults. This man becomes a Communist or a liberal as they call them in England.

He sees that only in reducing all men to a common state he can feel, if not superior, at least equal. These persons cannot achieve or create but can certainly destroy that which others have achieved or created. You find these creatures in the academic world filled with hatred that they cannot create that which they teach or in trade unions where they curse the man who has built a factory that they could not. And if they come to power, they only ruin what they touch.

They start out by demanding that you accept the idea that all men are equal and every man must be the equal to…but not the superior to his neighbor. In mathematics this is called a common denominator. Now these intellectual unemployed want all men to be equal and they, of course, are the natural leaders of these masses because of their superior, if previously unrecognized, brilliance.

They manipulate the masses to whom they condescend in order to overthrow an existing government and supplant it with… themselves!.

And the tyranny of the market place, which is more or less natural, is replaced by the tyranny of the failed intellectual who knows with a certainty that he alone is right and wishes to force everyone not as brilliant as himself to worship him as a small clay God.”

 

 

 

Table of Contents

  • Too Many Wars. Too Many Enemies.
  • US general: US troops won’t withdraw from Syrian city of Manbij
  • Turkey’s huge crackdown is destroying civil society
  • Secrecy News 
  • Tet Offensive
  • The Doomsday Weapon
  • Saudi anti-corruption drive generates $106bn in settlements
  • Trump administration refuses to impose new Russia sanctions despite law
  • Second Trump-Russia dossier being assessed by FBI
  • Austria’s Sebastian Kurz backs Hungary’s Viktor Orban against EU migrant quotas
  • Russia’s Putin says Moscow wants to develop relations with the United States
  • Facebook ‘no place’ for young children
  • Robert Mueller’s forgotten surveillance crime spree

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TBR News January 29, 2018

Jan 29 2018 Published by under Uncategorized

The Voice of the White House

Washington, D.C. January 29, 2018: “There really are no intelligence secrets any more. Every nation spies on other nations and every nation spies on its own citizens. At the same time, many citizens spy on their governments and government-friendly social networks so I the end, nothing is hidden. Once, the major media was the sole source of news and the major media was tightly controlled by “interested parties,” the the print media is collapsing on all sides and television, as a source of genuine news, is right behind them. A few members of the rapidly declining print media have paywalls to limit free use but this is a vain act because the same news can be found, for free, on Google.Seek and ye shall find; knock and it shall be opened to you.”

Table of Contents

  • Kick Turkey Out of NATO
  • By Remaining in Syria the US Is Fuelling More Wars in the Middle East
  • US mission creep in Syria: Is it legal?
  • Rising internet shutdowns aimed at ‘silencing dissent’
  • Under Donald Trump, socialism seeps into US mainstream
  • Poisoned toothpaste and exploding phones: New book chronicles Israel’s ‘2,700’ assassination operations
  • ICR Leaked 2016 Israel Mossad Personal Information

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TBR News January 28, 2018

Jan 28 2018 Published by under Uncategorized

The Voice of the White House

Washington, D.C. January 28, 2018: “We see in the media that former President  George W. Bush’s approval rating is soaring upwards.The fickle public seems have to forgotten the gay sex scandal concerning fake reporter and male prostitute Jeff Gannon “slept over” on numerous occasions at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Gannon had previously advertised his services on the internet as a male prostitute “top” at $1200 per weekend.

White House overnight trysts were not uncommon, according to Secret Service logs of Jeff Gannon’s White House entries and exits, requested by Rep. Louise Slaughter (D-NY) and Rep. John Conyers (D-MI) using the FOIA (Freedom of Information Act).

Since “Jeff Gannon” has given the term “media whore” a whole new definition, the question arises — could “Jeff Gannon” be President George Bush’s Lewinsky albeit in gay apparel?

White House logs furnished by the Secret Service show that fake reporter Jeff Gannon (a.k.a James Guckert) stayed overnight at the White House on many occasions – even when press conferences or briefings were not scheduled. He was in the White House from 5:00 PM until 7:30 AM on fourteen recorded occasions.

These records reveal that the White House was like a Gay Roach Motel — they check in but they don’t check out.

FOIA documents reveal that Gannon signed in on many occasions, but never signed out, reports John Byrne in an exclusive report on Raw Story http://rawstory.com/exclusives/byrne/secret_service_gannon_424.htm

Gannon’s inexplicable access to the Bush White House as well as his shilling for GOP fake news outlet ‘Talon News’ (not to be confused with fake news by Jon Stewart of course) raises more questions about planted and paid-for Bushonian shills in the so-called mainstream media.

Gannon aka James Guckert appeared more than 200 times at the White House as a fake reporter in 2 years and attended 155 of 196 White House press briefings, reports Raw Story. Since Gannon was previously employed as a male prostitute, questions naturally arise regarding the nature of his overnight stays at the White House.

“On at least fourteen occasions, Secret Service records show either the entry or exit time missing,” Raw Story continues. “Generally, the existing entry or exit times correlate with press conferences; on most of these days, the records show that Guckert checked in but was never processed out.”

Who was Jeff Gannon servicing in the newly redecorated Gay Green Room?

The White House “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy was obviously not working.”

Table of Contents

 

  • ATM makers warn of ‘jackpotting’ hacks on U.S. machines
  • The Amazing Rise and Fall of a Rodent Utopia
  • New York prosecutor to investigate firm selling online followers
  • Hundreds of thousands living in squalid rented homes in England
  • EU drafting law to restrain Chinese takeovers
  • Is there Really a Russian Threat to Britain? 
  • Fitness tracking app gives away location of secret US army bases
  • US joins Poland in fight over pipeline
  • Bitcoin, Along With Other Cryptocurrencies, Collapse Over Crackdown Concerns
  • Mexico to send troops to stem violence after record 25,000 murders
  • A classic example of disinformation

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TBR News January 27, 2018

Jan 27 2018 Published by under Uncategorized

The Voice of the White House

Washington, D.C. January 27, 2018:”In scanning the web looking for interesting stories to use, it is noted that the New York Times and the Washington Post have been putting up paywalls. This means that one can download a limited numbere of free articles and to get more, one must subscribe to their system. This is because the print media is heading for oblivion as the public gets its news free from the Internet. Once the NYT had a limit of 20 stories a month. This was reduced to 10 stories a month as paid subscriptions melted away and now only 5 stories a month are free. The problem is that there is more immediate, and less controlled, information on the Internet and soon enough, the NYT will drop its limit to 2 a month. By that time, they will have two employees, one of whom doubles as a bun-puncher at MacDonalds. If one wants to know what sort of disbased propaganda the government has created to keep the tax-payers happy, read either one, or both, of these papers. And ads that proclaim “Only 4 cents a week!” are a farce because after two weeks, the prices leap upwards and credit cards are looted.”

 

 

Table of Contents

  • US, Poland oppose undersea pipeline from Russia to Germany
  • The Sackler family made billions from OxyContin. Why do top US colleges take money tainted by the opioid crisis?
  • Media Madness: book shows Trump White House obsessed with press
  • Examining ‘Ten Myths about Israel’, by Ilan Pappe
  • More teens eating Tide Pods despite warnings, as meme earns commercial appeal

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TBR News January 26, 2018

Jan 26 2018 Published by under Uncategorized

The Voice of the White House

Washington, D.C. January 26, 2018: “Here is an informative excerpt from a CIA manual on interrogation:

THE INTERROGATION OF SUSPECTS UNDER ARREST

Your virtuous interrogator, like the virtuoso in any field, will tell you that formulating the principles of his art would be a presumptuous and sterile procedure. Interrogators are born, not made, he almost says, and good interrogation is the organic product of intuition, experience, and native skill, not reducible to a set of mechanical components. Yet the organic whole can usefully be dissected, and examination will reveal its structural principles.

This article selects from the many different ramifications of the interrogation art that genre which is applicable to suspected agents under arrest, and sets forth some of the principles and procedures which characterize it. The essay is slanted toward relatively unsophisticated cases, and does not cover the subtler techniques which should be used, for example, against a suspected double agent, nor those required when access to the subject or the control of his person is limited. It does, however, treat interrogation as a process designed to yield the highest possible intelligence dividend. Such an interrogation is usually incompatible with one intended to produce legal evidence for a court conviction, since statements by the accused may be barred as court evidence on the ground that they were made under duress, during prolonged detention without charge, or in some other violation of legal procedures.

An interrogation yields the highest intelligence dividend when the interrogee finally becomes an ally, actively cooperating with the interrogator to produce the information desired. It is to a discussion of principles and procedures helpful in transforming a recalcitrant prisoner into something approaching an ally that this article is devoted. This kind of interrogation is essentially a battle of wills in which the turning-point is reached as the subject realizes the futility of his position. It usually develops in three tactical phases: a) breaking the cover story; b) convincing the subject that resistance is pointless and acquiescence the better part of valor; and c) getting active cooperation.

The question of torture should be disposed of at once. Quite apart from moral and legal considerations, physical torture or extreme mental torture is not an expedient device. Maltreating the subject is from a strictly practical point of view as short-sighted as whipping a horse to his knees before a thirty-mile ride. It is true that almost anyone will eventually talk when subjected to enough physical pressures, but the information obtained in this way is likely to be of little intelligence value and the subject himself rendered unfit for further exploitation. Physical pressure will often yield a confession, true or false, but what an intelligence interrogation seeks is a continuing flow of information.

No two interrogations are the same. The character, behavior, and degree of resistance of each new subject must be carefully assessed, and his estimated weaknesses used as the basis of a plan for intensive examination and exploitation. Each interrogation is thus carefully tailored to the measure of the individual subject. The standard lines of procedure, however, may be divided into four parts: a) arrest and detention; b) preliminary interview and questioning; c) intensive examination; and d) exploitation. The first three stages may often be merged; they constitute the softening-up process during which the cover story is broken and the subject may be shown up as a liar, an important step in making him realize the futility of further resistance.

In the matter of proving the subject a liar a word of caution is necessary. Showing some subjects up as liars is the very worst thing to do, because their determination not to lose face will only make them stick harder to the lie. For these it is necessary to provide loopholes by asking questions which let them correct their stories without any direct admission to lying.

When the cover story and the will to resist have been broken, when the subject is ready to answer a series of carefully prepared questions aimed at an intelligence target, the exploitation can begin, often in a veiled spirit of cooperation and mutual assistance. At this stage the interrogation may for example be moved to an office assigned the subject, where he might even be left alone for a few minutes to show that he is being trusted and that there is something constructive for him to do. This feeling of trust and responsibility can be very important to a broken subject, because he may now have suicidal inclinations; he must be given something to occupy his mind and keep him from too much introspection.

We shall examine in detail each stage of the interrogation procedure after a word on the language problem. Without doubt an interrogator using the subject’s language is in a much better position than one who has to work through an interpreter. But the interrogation skill is infinitely more important than the language skill, and a good linguist should not be substituted for a good interrogator. In the absence of an interrogator who speaks the language, an interpreter should be used, preferably one with some training in interrogation techniques. It is very important that the interpreter not only report accurately what both parties say but also reflect as faithfully as he can their inflection, tone, manner, and emphasis. He should try to become part of the furniture in the room rather than a third personality, and the interrogator should act as though he were not there.

Arrest and Detention

The interrogations officer, since his critical objective is breaking the subject’s will to resist, should attempt to control the psychological factors in every aspect of the subject’s life from the earliest possible stage, normally the time of arrest. If possible, he should plan in advance the conditions of arrest and immediate detention. If the subject is already in detention, the principles set down in the following paragraphs may be applied to his removal from ordinary detention to the place of interrogation.

The arrest should take the subject by surprise and should impose on him the greatest possible degree of mental discomfort, in order to catch him off balance and deprive him of the initiative. It should take place at a moment when he least expects it and when his mental and physical resistance is at its lowest. The ideal time which meets these conditions is in the early hours before dawn, when an abrupt transition from sleep to alert mental activity is most difficult.

If the arrest cannot be made during the pre-dawn sleep, the next best time is in the evening, when a person is normally relaxed in his own home. One is most impressionable when relaxing at home, as witness the findings of advertising firms who have studied the impact of television commercials. A less desirable time is in the morning when the day’s routine begins, especially in the case of underground personnel, because they will have thought through the day ahead of them and steeled themselves to its risks.

The police detachment which effects the arrest, or removal from detention to the interrogation center, should impress the prisoner with its cool efficiency and assurance.   This scene is important enough to justify a rehearsal, if necessary. A subject arrested by three or four ill-dressed, clumsy policemen is more likely to regain his composure after the initial shock and draw some confidence from his superiority over his captors. If he is abruptly awakened by an arresting party of particularly tall, smart, well-equipped and business-like officers, he will probably be exceedingly anxious about his future.

The arresting party should also be schooled in observing the prisoner’s reactions and in the techniques for a quick but thorough search of his room and person. In ordinary arrests there are arguments for having the prisoner witness the searching of his room: he cannot then claim theft or willful damage to his property; he can be asked questions about what is found; and his reactions may help the searchers uncover hidden objects. But during the search preceding an intelligence interrogation it is usually better to have the subject out of the room; his ignorance as to what has been found there will foster uncertainty and uneasiness in his mind. One member of the arresting party should be specifically charged with watching the prisoner’s reaction to everything that goes on.

Other aspects of the arrest and the conditions of initial detention should be governed by the interrogator’s preliminary assessment of the subject’s personality and character on the basis of records, reports, and any other sources available. If, for example, the prisoner belongs to a subversive organization which makes a practice of stressing the harsh and summary treatment its members should expect if they let themselves fall into the hands of the security authorities, the arresting party might make a point of treating him correctly and even courteously. This unanticipated finesse might disconcert his antagonism and be a useful factor in winning him over later.

Some of the alternative detention conditions from which the interrogator must choose according to his preliminary assessment of the subject are: a) a long period or brief interval between arrest and initial questioning, b) solitary confinement or quartering with other prisoners, c) comfortable or discomfiting accommodations, and d) subjection to comprehensive personal search or no. Some subject-types would be enabled by any delay between arrest and questioning to firm up a cover story, regain their composure, and fortify themselves against the interrogation. On the other hand, a prisoner left in solitary confinement for a long period with no one, not even his custodian, speaking a word to him may be thoroughly unnerved by the experience. When this course is chosen it is important to deprive the prisoner of all his personal possessions, especially of things like snapshots and keepsakes, symbols of his old life which might be a source of moral strength to him.

Other techniques which may or may not be employed at this stage, according to the subject’s personality, include the use of a stool-pigeon, the double stool-pigeon routine, microphoning the cell and doctoring it in other ways. The double stoolpigeon technique has two stool-pigeons in the cell when the prisoner arrives. One of them befriends him, warns him that the other is a stool-pigeon, and if possible enlists his help in agitating for the removal of this plant. When the third man has been removed the subject may have come to trust his fellow-agitator and confide in him. The cell can be doctored by having messages written on the walls, either with deceptive content recommending for example some attendant as a sympathetic channel to the outside or with discouraging and depressive impact.

The Preliminary Interview

The preliminary interview is not intended to obtain intelligence, but only to enable the interrogators to make a firm assessment of the character and type of subject with whom they will have to deal. It is useful to have the interrogators – preferably two of them – seated behind a table at the far end of a long room, so that the subject after entering will have some distance to walk before taking his chair in front of them. This device will enable them to observe his poise and manner, and may often quite unsettle the subject. The interrogators should sit with their backs to the main source of light in order to obscure their faces, veil their expressions, and place a strain on the prisoner.

The subject can be placed under further strain by providing him an uncomfortable chair, say one with a polished seat and shortened front legs so that he tends to slide off it, or one with wobbly legs. On the other hand, an opposite technique has sometimes been successful: the prisoner is made so comfortable, after a hearty lunch with beer, that he drops his guard in drowsiness.

The interview must of course be recorded, either on tape or in stenographic notes. The interrogators must on no account try to do this job themselves; it would distract them from the critical task of framing questions and steering the course of interrogation according to the implications of the subject’s replies. Whether the stenographer or recorder should be concealed or visible depends on the subject’s sophistication and the state of his alert. If the recording process is not evident some subjects may become careless of what they say when they see that the interrogators are not taking notes, whereas a visible recording would alert them to be more cautious. For others, consciousness of a recording going on in full view may be unnerving, and they may betray the weak links in their stories by showing signs of distress at these points.

At a later stage of the interrogation it may be of value to play back to the subject some part of this recording. The sound of his own voice repeating his earlier statements, particularly any with intonations of anger or distress, may make a psychological breach in his defenses.

The attitude of the interrogators at the preliminary interview should usually be correct, studiously polite, and in some cases even sympathetic. It is imperative that they keep their tempers both now and throughout the interrogation. The prisoner may be given the true reason for his arrest or a false one, or he may be left in doubt, according to the circumstances of the case. The interrogators must try to determine whether his usually vigorous protestations of innocence are genuine or an act, but they should not at this stage give any indication of whether they believe or disbelieve him. A clever prisoner will try to find out how much the interrogators know; they should at all costs remain poker-faced and non-committal.

At this interview the interrogators should do as little as possible of the talking, however many questions they are anxious to have answered. The prisoner should be asked to tell his story in his own words, describe the circumstances of his arrest, give the history of some period of his life, or explain the details of his occupation. The object is to get him to talk without prompting in as much continuous narrative as possible; the more he talks the better the interrogators can assess his personality.

Personalities are individual, but some typing of subjects can be done cutting across factors of race or background. One category displays no emotion whatever and will not speak a word; another betrays his anxiety about what is going to happen to him; a third is confident and slightly contemptuous in his assurance; a fourth maintains an insolent attitude but remains silent; a fifth tries to annoy his interrogators by pretending to be hard of hearing or by some trick like repeating each question before answering it.

After the interview the interrogators should confer, formulate their assessment of the subject’s character, and work out a plan of intensive examination, including the kind of detention conditions to be applied between questionings. The details of this plan will vary widely, but it will be based on two principles, that of maintaining psychological superiority over the prisoner and that of disconcerting his composure by devices to bewilder him.

The Intensive Examination

The intensive examination is the scene of the main battle of wits with the prisoner, having the critical objective of breaking his cover story. The cover story, if it is a good one, will be a simple explanation of the subject’s activities as a straight-forward normal person, plausible even to his close friends, containing a minimum of fabrication and that minimum without detail susceptible to a check or ramifications capable of development. Its weakness may often lie in the subject’s abnormal precision about certain details, especially when two or more subjects are using the same cover story.

The most difficult subject is one who will not talk at all, and prolonging his solitary confinement usually increases the difficulty of getting him to talk. It is best to put him into a labor gang or some such group of prisoners where he may be drawn into conversation. After some days or perhaps weeks he may be communicating normally with these others, and may have concluded that his interrogators have given him up for good. At that time some incident can be created involving the labor gang which requires that they all be questioned. If innocuous questions are put to the silent prisoner rapidly in a routine and indifferent manner, he may answer them. He may then find it hard to revert to complete silence if caught off guard as the questioning is switched without break to matters of real interest. The device of starting with questions easy for the subject to answer is useful with many whose replies to significant questions are hard to elicit.

Everything possible must be done to impress upon the subject the unassailable superiority of those in whose hands he finds himself and therefore the futility of his position. The interrogators must show throughout an attitude of assurance and unhurried determination. Except as part of a trick or plan they should always appear unworried and complete masters of the situation in every respect. In the long and arduous examination of a stubborn subject they must guard against showing the weariness and impatience they may well feel. If a specialist in the subject’s field is used to interrogate him, say scientist to interrogate a prisoner with a scientific specialty, this interrogator must have unquestioned superiority over the subject in his own field.

Many prisoners have reported amazement at their own capacity for resistance to any stable pressures or distresses of an interrogation, such as onerous conditions of confinement or the relentless bullying of a single interrogator. What is demoralizing, they find, is drastic variation of cell conditions and abrupt alternation of different types of interrogators. A sample device in the regulation of cell conditions for unsophisticated prisoners is the manipulation of time: a clock in a windowless cell can be rigged to move rapidly at times and very slowly at others; breakfast can be brought in when it is time for lunch or in the middle of the night’s sleep; the interval between lunch and dinner can be lengthened to twelve or fifteen hours or shortened to one or two.

The questioning itself can be carried out in a friendly, persuasive manner, from a hard, merciless and threatening posture, or with an impersonal and neutral approach. In order to achieve the disconcerting effect of alternation among these attitudes it may be necessary to use as many as four different interrogators playing the following roles, although one interrogator may sometimes double in two of them:

First, the cold, unfeeling individual whose questions are shot out as from a machine-gun, whose voice is hard and monotonous, who neither threatens nor shows compassion.

Second, the bullying interrogator who uses threats, insults and sarcasm to break through the subject’s guard by making him lose his temper or by exhausting him.

Third, the ostensibly naive and credulous questioner, who seems to be taken in by the prisoner’s story, makes him feel smarter than the interrogator, gives him his rope and builds up false confidence which may betray him.

Finally, the kind and friendly man, understanding and persuasive, whose sympathetic approach is of decisive importance at the climactic phase of the interrogation. He is most effectively used after a siege with the first and second types, or after a troubled sleep following such a siege.

The course of the intensive questioning cannot be standardized, but some useful procedures are outlined in the following paragraphs.

When the subject is brought in he is asked to tell again the story he gave at his preliminary interview. Then he is asked to repeat it, and again a third time. He will be annoyed and with luck might even lose his temper. He at least will be worried about possible inconsistencies among the four versions he has given. In some cases it will be better that the interrogator not disclose his awareness of any such inconsistencies; in others it may be advantageous to emphasize them by making a comparison in his presence and perhaps playing back a recording.

If the cover story is still intact, the next step is to probe for detail. One of two interrogators questions rapidly into many details of a particular aspect of some incident. Then the other puts detailed questions on another aspect of the same incident. Then the first takes up a third aspect, and so on alternately for some time. The object is to force the subject to invent detail hastily. Finally, without any break, the interrogators start going back over their detail questions a second time; and the subject, not having had time to fix his improvisations in mind, is most unlikely to remember them.

By deliberately misquoting the subject’s replies the interrogator may often succeed in confusing him, or better yet in irritating him and making him lose his temper. A talkative subject should always be encouraged to give full and lengthy explanations; he is likely of his own accord to get mixed up and introduce inconsistencies into his story. Catching the subject in a lie of relatively little importance sometimes unnerves him and starts his resistance crumbling.

A not too sophisticated subject can be told that his fellow-conspirators have let him down, that an informer among them has betrayed his secret, or that some of them are in custody and have been persuaded to talk. Incriminating testimony from others, true or false, can be read to him, or a hooded man can pretend to recognize and identify him. The subject can be placed in profile at a window while two guards lead a “prisoner” past outside who will send in word that he recognizes his true identity.

Sometimes a very long period of silence while the interrogators are pretending to go over critical evidence will unnerve the subject.

The whole procedure is a probe for an opening – a confession of guilt, an admission to having lied, a state of confusion or even extreme concern on some particular point. Once an opening is found, however small, every effort is concentrated on enlarging it and increasing the subject’s discomposure. At this stage he is allowed no respite until he is fully broken and his resistance at an end.

The Exploitation

When the subject has ceased to resist his interrogators and is ready to talk freely he must be handled with great care, both because this attitude may change and because he may now have suicidal impulses. He should get better treatment and better detention conditions. He should be induced to ally himself with his interrogators, and encouraged to believe that he is doing something useful and constructive in assisting them. It is often important to keep him hard at work regardless of whether the product of his efforts is of any real value; he could be asked to write out a lot of details about his subversive organition, for example, whether or not such information were required. The object is to keep him busy, to keep his mind occupied, to prevent his having time for introspection.

Since interrogators for the exploitation must be well acquainted in the particular field of information involved, it may now be necessary either to introduce new specialist interrogators or to give the earlier ones a thorough briefing in this field. Which course is better will depend on the subject’s character, the way he was broken, and his present attitude toward those who have been handling him. Sometimes only a fresh interrogator can get real cooperation from him. Sometimes, on the other hand, he is so ashamed of having broken that he is unwilling to expose himself further and wants to talk only to his original questioner. And sometimes he has built up a trustful and confiding relationship with his interrogator which should not be destroyed by the introduction of another personality.’”

 

 

Table of Contents

  • Korea, the Winter Olympics, and the Spirit of Queen Min
  • Turkey’s Erdogan threatens to expand Syria border offensive
  • 50 Percent for 5 Percent: A Look at Germany’s Extremely Unequal Wealth Distribution
  • Homeless in Hong Kong: soaring costs fuel housing crisis in Asian financial hub
  • Coming Social Chaos
  • One cigarette a day ‘increases heart disease and stroke risk’
  • Voting with their wallets: Political affiliations increasingly influence American consumer habits
  • Why are we still shedding our soldiers’ blood for pedophiles?
  • Factbox: What is in Trump’s framework for immigration legislation
  • Sweeping Netanyahu corruption cases under the rug puts spotlight on western media bias
  • N.Y., Minnesota sue Trump admin to block healthcare funding cuts
  • WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange asks UK court to scrap arrest warrant

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TBR News January 25, 2018

Jan 25 2018 Published by under Uncategorized

The Voice of the White House

Washington, D.C. January 25, 2018:” Israel is not a friend to the United States. This is because Israel runs one of the most aggressive and damaging espionage networks targeting the US. The fact of Israeli penetration into the country is not a subject that is ever discussed in the media or in the circles of governance, due to the extreme sensitivity of the US-Israel relationship coupled with the burden of the Israel lobby, which punishes legislators who dare to criticize the Jewish state.

According to a 2018 CIA report, the Israelis, while targeting political secrets, also devote “a considerable portion of their covert operations to obtaining scientific and technical intelligence.” These operations involved, among other machinations, “attempts to penetrate certain classified defense projects in the United States.” The penetrations, according to the CIA report, were effected using “deep cover enterprises,” which the report described as “firms and organizations, some specifically created for, or adaptable to, a specific objective.”

The agency, called the Office of Special Plans (OSP), was set up by the then Defense Secretary, Donald Rumsfeld, to second-guess CIA information and operted under the patronage of hard-line conservatives in the highest levels of the Bush Administrtion, the Pentagon and in the White House itself, led in that areas by then Vice-President Cheney.”

Table of Contents

  • The Great Rice Disease Plot
  • Chinese labs use mail to send opioid fentanyl into US, Senate report finds
  • Chinese Arming American Right-Wing resistance groups
  • Donald Trump warns Turkey over Syria incursion: White House
  • Manbij Becomes Key as US Looks to Rein in Turkey’s Syrian Offensive
  • Syria war: Germany suspends upgrade to Turkey tanks
  • The secrets of Israel’s assassination operations
  • Government Will Protect Us From Bad Speech? That’s the Fakest News of All.
  • DOJ warns release of House Intel memo on FBI, Clinton campaign could ‘harm national security’
  • Trump Administration Weighs Whether to Extend Protections for Thousands of Syrians

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TBR News January 24, 2018

Jan 24 2018 Published by under Uncategorized

The Voice of the White House

Washington, D.C. January 24, 2018:”The so-called FISA abuse memo is typical of the way the government is run. Warring intelligence agencies, greedy military contractors, special interest groups and much more love to spend tax-payers dollars and give nothing in return. This memo, believed to be secret, is now up on the Internet, thanks to the all-seeing, all-wise Facebook. There are no secrets because anything sent by Internet can, and is, read by others. Hillary’s problem during the last Presidential election is that her camp paid out less in bribes than did the Trump camp so now screeching enemies are trying to even the score.”

Table of Contents

  • Secrecy News
  • Destroying Syria
  • Assad’s Victory: What Comes after War in Syria?
  • Facebook pretending to care about democracy now is the height of hypocrisy
  • Unveiled; What Exactly Is In the Memo, According to Intel Insiders
  • Classified FISA Abuse Memo
  • NSA Deletes “Honesty” and “Openness” From Core Values

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TBR News January 23, 2018

Jan 23 2018 Published by under Uncategorized

The Voice of the White House

Washington, D.C. January 22, 2018:”Here is an actual email we got from a reader. Out of kindness we have redacted their name but none of the text has been altered. This writer is not a Millennial because they apparently can spell polysyllabic words correctly:

‘What they say about the Potter books is 100% correct! Our son Pauli, who was only 9 years old, set the cat on fire last week and poor Mr. Spats made terrible cries and ran around the living room until he burned up. He ran under a couch and set it on fire and my husband, Karl, was so upset that he chased Pauli outside and beat him with a garden hoe but in the meantime, the couch set the house on fire and Grandma Tom was asleep upstairs and didn’t make it out. We found the Potter book in Pauli’s tree house along with terrible pictures of naked ladies and an empty muscatel bottle so I agree that these books have to be banned forever! Now that Pauli and Grandma Tom are dead, the writer of this book and the bookstores that sell it ought to be shot.’”

Table of Contents

  • Pennsylvania court orders new congressional map due to gerrymandering
  • A Coming Russia-Ukraine War?
  • California County evicts hundreds from homeless camp – with few beds to offer
  • Foxes in Charge of Intelligence Hen House
  • Intelligence agency militias
  • FBI Facial Recognition System Gives Officers an Investigative Lead
  • The Dead Enders

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TBR News January 22, 2018

Jan 22 2018 Published by under Uncategorized

The Voice of the White House

Washington, D.C. January 22, 2018:” Because of the growing, and serious, public discontent that had been manifested during the course of the Vietnamese War from 1950 through 1973, the American governmental establishment resolved to take steps to recognize, infiltrate and neutralize any significant future national anti-government actions.

Once the most powerful nation, the United States is rapidly losing its premier position in the international sphere while at the same time facing a potential serious anti-government political movement developing in that country. The number of unemployed in the United States today is approximately 97,000,000. Official American sources claim that employment is always improving but in fact it is not. Most official governmental releases reflect wishful thinking or are designed to placate the public

This situation is caused by the movement, by management, of manufacturing businesses to foreign labor markets. While these removals can indeed save the companies a great deal of expenditure on domestic labor, by sharply reducing their former worker bodies to a small number, the companies have reduced the number of prospective purchasers of expensive items like automobiles.

The U.S. government’s total revenue is estimated to be $3.654 trillion for fiscal year 2018.

  • Personal income taxes contribute $1.836 trillion, half of the total.
  • Another third ($1.224 trillion) comes from payroll taxes.

This includes $892 billion for Social Security, $270 billion for Medicare and $50 billion for unemployment insurance.

  • Corporate taxes add $355 billion, only 10 percent.
  • Customs excise taxes and tariffs on imports contribute $146 billion, just 4 percent
  • The Federal Reserve’s net income adds $70 billion.
  • The remaining $23 billion of federal income comes from estate taxes and miscellaneous receipts.
  • The use of secret offshore accounts by US citizens to evade U.S. federal taxes costs the U.S. Department of the Treasury well over $100 billion annually.

By moving from a producing to an importing entity, the United States has developed, and is developing, serious sociological and economic problems in a significant number of its citizens, and many suffer from serious health problems that are not treated.

It is estimated that over 500,000 American citizens are without any form of housing. Many of these people either are living on the streets, in public parks, living in cars or in charity shelters. There are at present over 200,000 family groups in America with over 300,000 individuals involved and 25% of the total are minor children.

Over 80,000 individuals are permanently without any residence. Many of these have physical disabilities such as chronic alcoholism or drug addiction. Many are classified as having severe mental disorders.

About 50,000 of these homeless individuals are military veterans, many of whom have serious physical or mental problems. One of the most common mental disorders is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Governmental treatment for these individuals is virtually non-existent.  Approximately half of this number are either black or Latin American (“Hispanics” in official designation.)

Of the total number of the homeless individuals, approximately 10% are female.

Official but private, estimates are that there over 500,000 youths below the age of 24 in current American society that find themselves homeless for periods lasting from one week to a permanent status.

Over 100,000 of this class are young people who are defined as being homosexual. Those in this class find themselves persecuted to a considerable degree by society in general and their peer groups in specific.

Approximately 50% of this homeless population are over the age of 50, many of whom suffer from chronic, debilitating physical illnesses that are not treated.

Drug deaths in the U.S. in 2017 exceeded 60,000.  Nearly half of all opioid overdose deaths involved prescriptions. Opioids are a class of strong painkillers drugs and include Percocet, Vicodin and OxyContin which are synthetic drugs designed to resemble opiates such as opium derived morphine and heroin. The most dangerous opioid is Fentanyl, a synthetic opioid painkiller 50-100 times more powerful than morphine. The increasing demand for these drugs is causing them to be manufactured outside the United States.

Suicide is the primary cause of “injury death” in the United States and more U.S. military personnel on active duty have killed themselves than were killed in combat last year.

The growing instability of American families is manifested by the fact that:

  • One out of every three children in America lives in a home without a father.
  • More than half of all babies are being born out of wedlock for women under the age of 30 living in the United States
  • The United States has the highest child abuse death rate in the developed world.
  • The United States has the highest teen pregnancy rate in the world although the numbers have declined in recent years due to the use of contraceptives.

The United States has the highest incarceration rate and the largest total prison population in the entire world. The criminal justice system in the United States holds more than 4,166,000 people in 1,719 state prisons, 102,000 in federal prisons, 901,000 in juvenile correctional facilities, and 3,163,000 in local jails. Additionally, 5,203,400 adults are on probation or on parole.

The number of people on probation or parole has increased the population of the American corrections system to more than 9,369,400 in 2017. Corrections costs the American taxpayer $69 billion a year.”

 

 

Table of Contents

  • Senate moves to end government shutdown
  • Russsia-Gate Implodes
  • FBI ‘Failed To Preserve’ Five Months Of Text Messages Between Anti-Trump FBI Agents
  • It’s Time We Saw Sanctions for What They Really Are – War Crimes
  • Blowback: How U.S. Drones, Coups, and Invasions Just Create More Violence
  • San Francisco or Mumbai? UN envoy encounters homeless life in California
  • An Insurgent Campaign Is Targeting the Very Heart of the Chicago Democratic Machine — and Just Might Win
  • ‘Legalized loan sharking’: payday loan customers recount their experiences
  • World’s richest 1% bagged 82% of global wealth in 2017, while poorest half got nothing – Oxfam
  • Merkel’s Got Some Explaining To Do
  • Catalan crisis rekindled as parliament proposes Puigdemont as leader

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